LCWA World Affairs Colloquium Spring 2019

On January, 14th LCWA will host Dr. Steven Lee, Associate Professor of English, University of California, Berkeley
Author of The Ethnic Avant-Garde: Minority Cultures and World Revolution, to present the lecture, “Beyond Interference: Soviet and Russian Lessons for
American Multiculturalism.”

Russian interference in the 2016 elections included the manipulation of U.S. identity politics: for instance, fake social media accounts promoted rallies both for and against the Black Lives Matter movement, apparently with the intent of exacerbating social discord. The new Cold War here merges with our new culture wars.
This circumstance finds a hopeful precedent from the old Cold War, when Jim Crow was a favorite topic for Soviet propaganda, which indirectly led to U.S. civil rights reform. Building on this precedent, my talk focuses on how Soviet and Russian discourses on race, ethnicity, and nationality might open new ways of conceptualizing multiculturalism here in the U.S. I’ll be arguing that in the Soviet Union, one’s identity as a minority subject could be simultaneously essential yet irrelevant, eternal yet absent—a phenomenon I trace back to both official nationalities policy and avant-gardist performance. The result was a layered, estranged approach to identity, one that possibly contributed to the USSR’s collapse but which also provides, I think, a useful complement to contemporary U.S. discourses of “otherness” and “intersectionality.”
As a case in point, I will then discuss the half-Korean, half-Russian rock star Viktor Tsoi (the Kurt Cobain of late socialism), the difficulty of ascribing any fixed identity to him, and his 1990 visit to the Sundance Film Festival.

Co-sponsored by the Russian Studies Program and European Studies Program.

Global Foodways in Skirt Magazine

Professor Lauren Ravalico, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of French and Francophone Studies and a member of the executive committee for Women’s and Gender Studies at the College of Charleston. In this article she discusses her research and passion for the Global Foodways program.

“This stew of intellectual interest and personal connection to the kitchen has simmered for a long time and ultimately inspired me to attempt coordinating a yearlong program of courses and events at the College of Charleston called “Global Foodways.” Besides having the opportunity to teach my own “Culture of the French Table” course as part of the program, it has been amazing to see the range of disciplines in which food takes the spotlight. Students can learn about the history of tea in China, the sociology of food, food culture and sustainability in Italy, food as medicine, and dozens of other options.”

“It is my hope that Global Foodways will serve as a virtual table around which members of the academic community and beyond can engage in conversations and sensory experiences that open our hearts and minds.”

Check out the full article here!

https://www.skirt.com/global-foodways/ 

 

 

Global Foodways in The College Today!

Erin Perkins of The College Today sat down with professor Lauren Ravalico who created the Global Foodways program as the 2018-2019 World Affairs Signature Series. They discussed the how the program will be a year of courses and events for understanding the global meanings of food featuring courses in anthropology, biology, Chinese, environmental and sustainability studies, exercise science, French, health, history, Italian, religion, sociology, Southern studies, Spanish, Russian, and women’s and gender studies.

Exciting events, including tastings, cooking demonstrations, lectures and discussions, film screenings, and theatrical performances will bridge the local and the international to focus on: Community of the Table | Sustainable Eating Practices | Historical and Political Perspectives on Food

You can check out the full article here: http://today.cofc.edu/2018/10/19/global-foodways-program/ 

LCWA World Affairs Colloquium Series: Creating a Start-Up Region in Israel-Palestine

On October 28th at 10am in Arnold Hall Yadin Kaufmann will be presenting the lecture “Creating a Start-Up Region in Israel-Palestine.”

Stagnant economic growth, high unemployment, and a sharp decline in donor aid to Palestine create a volatile mix that breeds instability in the region. This situation is bad for Palestinians and dangerous for Israel. A bright spot in the otherwise grim Palestinian economic horizon is the technology ecosystem that has begun to develop in recent years. The technology sector, which already accounts for some 6% of Palestinian GDP, can be the engine to drive economic growth in Palestine, as it has been in neighboring Israel, with similar positive impacts. This is important both for Palestine and for Israel – irrespective of political developments.

Yadin Kaufmann has been involved in early-stage venture capital investments in Israel since 1987, through Athena, the first Israel-focused venture fund, and Veritas Venture Partners, which he co-founded in 1990. In 2011, Yadin co-founded Sadara Ventures, the first fund targeting investments in Palestinian technology companies. Most recently, Yadin founded and is Chairman of the Palestinian Internship Program, a non-profit organization that brings recent Palestinian university graduates for three-month internships at tech and finance companies in Israel. Yadin received his B.A. from Princeton, M.A. from Harvard, and J.D. from Harvard Law School, where he was an editor of the Law Review. Foreign Policy named Yadin to the list of 100 “Leading Global Thinkers” in 2017. Yadin lives in Israel, but is a Charlestonian by marriage: his wife Lori Banov Kaufmann is the daughter of Dr. Charles and Nancy Banov.

Co-sponsored by Academic Affairs and the School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs

HISP Faculty Focus, September 2018: Dr. Vicki Garrett

Dr. Vicki Garrett

After obtaining her Ph.D. in Hispanic Languages and Literatures at the University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Vicki Garrett moved east where she spent four years as a Teaching Assistant Professor and Director of Latin American Studies at West Virginia University.  In August 2015, she joined the College of Charleston’s Department of Hispanic Studies as an Adjunct Instructor, and in 2016 she transitioned to her current position as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish.  In her 3 years to date at CofC, she has already managed to teach an impressive range of courses to include basic Spanish language through advanced literature for the Spanish major, Spanish literature in translation, and classes for the Latin American and Caribbean Studies and First Year Experience programs. Dr. Garrett has also contributed to the College outside the classroom through her service on the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Executive Committee and Curriculum Review Committee as well as the Hispanic Studies Student Awards Committee.

Also an active scholar, Dr. Garrett researches Latin American theater and cinema; Argentine cultural studies; disability studies, violence, and the body; and the intersections of gender ethnicity and the environment.  Since joining the College of Charleston faculty, she has enjoyed multiple publications, yet her most ambitious scholarly project to date is her book Performing Everyday Life in Argentine Popular Theater, 1890-1934 that will be published with Palgrave Macmillan in late 2018.

In her own words:

It is so inspiring to teach students who are passionate about social and environmental justice in an institution that empowers faculty to address these pressing 21st-century issues within our areas of expertise. One of my favorite things about teaching at CofC is that students are so eager to explore different perspectives on social issues through Latin(x) American literature and culture.

The Department of Hispanic Studies congratulates Dr. Garrett for her multi-layered contributions to our academic community at the College of Charleston, and for being selected for our September 2018 “Hispanic Studies Faculty Focus.”

Stay tuned for October 2018’s feature…

The International Studies Program is offering a new course this fall

INTL 390-02 ST: Africa and China
MW 2:00-3:15
Instructor: Dr. Julius Mutwol

(counts towards: INTL major – Africa and Asia concentrations, INTL Minor, the African Studies minor, and the POLI major)

This course examines China’s role in African economic development. Topics include historical and contemporary relationship and expanded commercial ties, trade, assistance and investment, as well as China’s policy of non-interference in Africa’s domestic affairs. We will also examine China’s investment and aid by sub-regions of Africa, and in specific sectors of African economies, especially in infrastructure development, oil extraction, mining, and agriculture. The course will also highlight controversial areas of China’s engagement with Africa, especially concerns about human rights, labor issues, and the environment.

Dr. Mutwol is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Charleston Southern University. He holds a Ph.D. in International Relations and an M.A. from Johns Hopkins University (SAIS), as well as a B.A. in Political Science from Cleveland State University. He is the author of Peace Agreements and Civil Wars in Africa (2010) and previously taught at Johns Hopkins and Wilberforce University before joining CSU. Originally from Kenya, Dr. Mutwol has also worked as a commentator for KASS FM International, a Kenyan radio station, and as a consultant for a variety of international organizations. He was honored by the Black History Intercollegiate Consortium with the Martin Luther King Jr. Award in 2015.