Tag Archives: college of charleston african american studies

African American Studies Faculty Book Celebration

Join us as we celebrate recent publications from our African American Studies faculty:

Thursday, February 16th at 5 pm
Thaddeus Street Jr. Education Center * Septima Clark Auditorium
25 St. Philip Street, Room 118

origin story: poems by Gary Jackson

origin story outlines a family history of distant sisters, grieving mothers and daughters, and alcoholic fathers. These poems take us from Kansas to Korea and back again in an attempt to reconnect with estranged family and familial ghosts divided by years of diaspora. An interrogation of cultural and personal myths, origin story wrestles with the questions: Who will remember us? How do we deal with the failures of memory? Whose stories are told?

My Soul Is a Witness: The Traumatic Afterlife of Lynching by Mari N. Crabtree

Black southerners often shielded their loved ones from the most painful memories of local lynchings with strategic silences but also told lynching stories about vengeful ghosts or a wrathful God or the deathbed confessions of a lyncher tormented by his past. They protested lynching and its legacies through art and activism, and they mourned those lost to a mob’s fury. They infused a blues element into their lynching narratives to confront traumatic memories and keep the blues at bay, even if just for a spell. Telling their stories troubles the simplistic binary of resistance or submission that has tended to dominate narratives of Black life and reminds us that amid the utter devastation of lynching were glimmers of hope and an affirmation of life.

My Soul Is a Witness traces the long afterlife of lynching in the South through the traumatic memories it left in its wake. She unearths how African American victims and survivors found ways to live through and beyond the horrors of lynching, offering a theory of African American collective trauma and memory rooted in the ironic spirit of the blues sensibility—a spirit of misdirection and cunning that blends joy and pain.

Reading Pleasures: An Evening with Tara A. Bynum

The Conseula Francis Emerging Scholar Lecture presents Tara A. Bynum and Reading Pleasures: Everyday Black Living in Early America

Tuesday, February 7th at 7 pm
Avery Research Center * Senator McKinley Washington Auditorium

 

In the early United States, a Black person committed an act of resistance simply by reading and writing. Yet we overlook that these activities also brought pleasure. In her book, Reading Pleasures: Everyday Black Living in Early America, Tara A. Bynum tells the compelling stories of four early American writers who expressed feeling good despite living while enslaved or only nominally free. The poet Phillis Wheatley delights in writing letters to a friend. Ministers John Marrant and James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw memorialize their love for God. David Walker’s pamphlets ask Black Americans to claim their victory over slavery. Together, their writings reflect the joyous, if messy, humanity inside each of them. This proof of a thriving interior self in pursuit of good feeling forces us to reckon with the fact that Black lives do matter.

Summer 2015 courses now posted.

Summer Courses have now been posted.  Please visit the Courses tab within this blog.

Please note that March 15 is the deadline to Study Abroad in Barbados this summer with Dr. Anthony Greene and Jon Hale! Check out the Tumblr page from last year to see what the experience is like.

Planners of Black History Museum in SC seek public input

From the Associated Press (Published on NewsOK •  Published: February 24, 2015)

“CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Organizers of a $75 million International African American Museum on Charleston Harbor are holding a public forum to get input from people on what the museum should display.

The forum is being held on Tuesday (February 24) near where the museum will be built.

Bernard Powers, a historian from the College of Charleston, is the head of the program committee.

Also attending the session is Ralph Appelbaum, the noted museum designer whose credits include developing exhibits for the Holocaust Museum, the Capitol Hill Visitor Center and the Newseum in Washington.

Officials announced last year that the Charleston museum will be built at the site of wharf where tens of thousands of slaves first set foot in the United States.”

MLK Jr. Day Speaker: Benjamin Jealous (former NAACP President)

Welcome, we are happy you are here!

MLK Jr. Day Speaker: Benjamin Jealous


Ben Jealous

Please join us for a special talk from Former NAACP President Benjamin Jealous! This event is free for all CofC students, faculty, staff, and the general public. The event will be January 15, at 7:00 PM in the Sotille Theater.

Benjamin Jealous has been a leader of successful state and local movements to ban the death penalty, outlaw racial profiling, defend voting rights, secure marriage equality, and free multiple wrongfully incarcerated people. Under his leadership, the NAACP grew to be the largest civil rights organization online and on mobile, experienced its first multi-year membership growth in 20 years, and became the largest community-based nonpartisan voter registration operation in the country. A builder of robust coalitions, Jealous’ leadership at the NAACP included bringing environmentalist organizations into the fight to protect voting rights, and convincing well-known conservatives to join the NAACP in challenging mass incarceration.

Jealous has been named to the 40 under 40 lists of both Forbes and Time magazines. He is #1 on TheRoot.com’s 2013 list of black leaders under 45.