Category Archives: book club

African American Studies Faculty Book Celebration

Join us as we celebrate recent publications from our African American Studies faculty:

Thursday, February 16th at 5 pm
Thaddeus Street Jr. Education Center * Septima Clark Auditorium
25 St. Philip Street, Room 118

origin story: poems by Gary Jackson

origin story outlines a family history of distant sisters, grieving mothers and daughters, and alcoholic fathers. These poems take us from Kansas to Korea and back again in an attempt to reconnect with estranged family and familial ghosts divided by years of diaspora. An interrogation of cultural and personal myths, origin story wrestles with the questions: Who will remember us? How do we deal with the failures of memory? Whose stories are told?

My Soul Is a Witness: The Traumatic Afterlife of Lynching by Mari N. Crabtree

Black southerners often shielded their loved ones from the most painful memories of local lynchings with strategic silences but also told lynching stories about vengeful ghosts or a wrathful God or the deathbed confessions of a lyncher tormented by his past. They protested lynching and its legacies through art and activism, and they mourned those lost to a mob’s fury. They infused a blues element into their lynching narratives to confront traumatic memories and keep the blues at bay, even if just for a spell. Telling their stories troubles the simplistic binary of resistance or submission that has tended to dominate narratives of Black life and reminds us that amid the utter devastation of lynching were glimmers of hope and an affirmation of life.

My Soul Is a Witness traces the long afterlife of lynching in the South through the traumatic memories it left in its wake. She unearths how African American victims and survivors found ways to live through and beyond the horrors of lynching, offering a theory of African American collective trauma and memory rooted in the ironic spirit of the blues sensibility—a spirit of misdirection and cunning that blends joy and pain.

Reading Pleasures: An Evening with Tara A. Bynum

The Conseula Francis Emerging Scholar Lecture presents Tara A. Bynum and Reading Pleasures: Everyday Black Living in Early America

Tuesday, February 7th at 7 pm
Avery Research Center * Senator McKinley Washington Auditorium

 

In the early United States, a Black person committed an act of resistance simply by reading and writing. Yet we overlook that these activities also brought pleasure. In her book, Reading Pleasures: Everyday Black Living in Early America, Tara A. Bynum tells the compelling stories of four early American writers who expressed feeling good despite living while enslaved or only nominally free. The poet Phillis Wheatley delights in writing letters to a friend. Ministers John Marrant and James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw memorialize their love for God. David Walker’s pamphlets ask Black Americans to claim their victory over slavery. Together, their writings reflect the joyous, if messy, humanity inside each of them. This proof of a thriving interior self in pursuit of good feeling forces us to reckon with the fact that Black lives do matter.

FALL 2020 Book Club

JOIN US FOR VIRTUAL BOOK CLUB
MEETINGS AND A VISIT FROM THE AUTHOR ON DECEMBER 2!
BOOK READINGS ARE IN LATE OCTOBER – DECEMBER
MEETINGS: TWICE IN NOVEMBER
OPEN TO ALL COFC STUDENTS, ALUMS, FACULTY, STAFF, & SUPPORTERS
RSVP TO RECEIVE INFORMATION ABOUT MEETINGS AND HOW TO GET YOUR COPY OF VANGUARD: HTTP://BIT.LY/VANGUARDCOFC

 

Spring 2020 Book Club Selection

The Spring 2020 book selection for the joint Carolina Lowcountry and Atlantic World Program and African American Studies is Every Nation Has Its Dish: Black Bodies & Black Food in Twentieth-Century America by Jennifer Jensen Wallach.  The book club meeting (there will only be one since it’s a relatively short book) will be lead by Jacob Steere-Williams.  If you are interested in participating, please let Sandy Slater know and she’ll send you a copy of the book via campus mail. Once we have a group of interested parties we will create a doodle-poll to find the best time for our meeting.