Category Archives: News

relevant local, national and international news

Port of Entry – Episode 2 – “Drinking Lemonade and Spilling Tea: An Interview with the women behind The Lemonade Reader”

Coming Soon!

Episode 2: “Drinking Lemonade and Spilling Tea: An Interview with the women behind The Lemonade Reader”

September 4, 2019
It’s Beyoncé’s birthday and what better way to celebrate than to gather the Beyhive for a black feminist dive into her most personal work? African American Studies alumni, Courtney Hicks (’19) interviews four contributors to The Lemonade Reader (Professors Regina Bradley, Kinitra Brooks, Birgitta Johnson, and Kameelah Martin) to discuss black women, the south, and Lemonade as African American Studies subject matter.

Port of Entry – Episode 1 – “Alumni Spotlight–Olivia Williams and that viral Washington Post article!”

Click the link below to listen to the 1st episode of Port of Entry!
Episode 1: “Alumni Spotlight–Olivia Williams and that viral Washington Post article!”Olivia Williams ’15

August 19, 2019
Kameelah Martin, Director of African American Studies at the College of Charleston interviews Olivia Williams (’15) on the heels of the Washington Post article that exposed white tourists who visit historic plantation sites and resent being presented with what actually transpired there. She also shares why completing a double major in African American Studies has been critical to her career trajectory.

The Long Afterlife of Brown V Board

Panel Explores 65th Anniversary of Brown vs. Board of Education Ruling.

To commemorate the 65th anniversary of the hallmark Brown v. Board decision and decade of subsequient court battles and protests, Dr. Millicent Brown and Caroll Y. Turpin will share their experiences as children who desegregated South Carolina’s public schools in the 1960’s.

Check out the article that was in The College Today!

 

 

African American Studies Student Art Competition

African American Studies Student Art Competition
Are you a student artist at the College of Charleston in search of new inspiration and an opportunity to showcase your work? Then the African American Studies Program has just the opportunity for you! Enter your work in the African American Studies Student Art Competition for a chance to win art materials and prominent display in the AAST office suite!

Requirements:
• This competition is open to currently enrolled CofC students only
• Artwork must be an original work of the student
• Entries must be in 2D Fine Art mediums (painting, drawing, printmaking, and/or
photography).
• Original art work should be a minimum of 11inches x14 inches and a maximum of
27inx40in in size.
• Entrants can submit up to five works for consideration.
• Artwork should be submitted as a high-resolution image of the original artwork in
.jpg file format.
Submission form must accompany each entry
• All entries must address some aspect/theme of the African Diaspora (culture,
people, and/or places) broadly defined.
• Submissions must be received by March 25, 2019

Judging:
Entries will be evaluated based on originality, interpretation of subject matter/theme,
creative techniques and overall art appearance. A panel of judges comprised of African
American Studies Faculty and Affiliates will evaluate each entry and rank each. The
entries with the highest rankings will receive the first and second place prize.

Prizes:
There will be a prize for first and second place winners. First place will receive $300 in
art supplies via Amazon.com and permanent display in the AAST office suite; Second
place will receive $200 in art supplies and permanent display in the AAST office suite.
Entries may also receive Honorable Mention and the opportunity for permanent display
in the AAST office suite.

Please contact Program Director for More Information:
Kameelah Martin
MartinKL2@cofc.edu
843-953-0675
Office: ECTR 207C

African American Studies Spring 2019 Film Festival: Afrofuturism on Film

The African American Studies Spring 2019 Film Festival, “Afrofuturism on Film,” will feature four evenings of films that assert that, regardless of whatever else the future holds, the future is most definitely and defiantly Black. Though the films in the festival take us from Los Angeles and the Gulf Coast to outer space and Wakanda, all of them envision futures centered on the peoples and cultures of Africa and the Diaspora. The screenings, which will be at 6:00 pm in Septima Clark Auditorium (Education Center 118), are free and open to the public, and each will be followed by a discussion led by a College of Charleston faculty member. Popcorn and soda will be served as well.

 

February 4: Blade (discussion led by Prof. Anthony Greene)

February 11: Beasts of the Southern Wild (discussion led by Prof. Lisa Young)

February 18: Pumzi and Other Shorts* (discussion led by Prof. Mari Crabtree)

February 25: Black Panther (discussion led by Prof. Gary Jackson and Prof. Matthew Cressler)

* The “other shorts” will include Janelle Monae’s Dirty Computer, clips from Sun Ra’s Space is the Place, and excerpts of a Parliament concert from their original Mothership Connection tour.

 

Adeyemi Oduwole’s internship at the Laboratory of Molecular Anthropology, at the University of Pennsylvania

In 2013, the remains for 36 likely African and African-descendant individuals were found during renovations at the Gaillard Center.  These burials date to the 1760s-1800.  Dr. Ade Ofunniyin (African American Studies) and Joanna Gilmore (Sociology and Anthropology), adjuncts at the College of Charleston and Gullah Society staff, are now working with Prof. Theodore Schurr and Raquel Fleskes, molecular anthropologists at the University of Pennsylvania, to explore the ancestry of the Anson Street individuals, prior to their reburial and the construction of a monument.

The Gullah Society is supported by the City of Charleston in this project and, with our colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania, has applied for a grant from the National Geographic Society, to conduct ancient DNA research to learn more about the individuals buried at Anson Street and to take DNA samples from 36 living individuals to try to find any ancestral ties between those buried at the site and those living in Charleston today. The Gullah Society is currently researching 18th century property owners for the land at George and Anson Street to try to identify and offer DNA tests to living descendants of the deceased.

This summer, a student from the College of Charleston, Adeyemi Oduwole, will complete a four-week internship with Dr. Theodore Schurr & Raquel Fleskes at the Laboratory of Molecular Anthropology, at the University of Pennsylvania.  Adeyemi is a junior, majoring in Biology, with a minor in Chemistry – Pre-medicine.  During his time in Pennsylvania, Adeyemi will learn how to characterize the mitochondrial DNA diversity of 36 contemporary individuals from Charleston.