Tag Archives: History

African American Studies Faculty Book Celebration

Join us as we celebrate recent publications from our African American Studies faculty:

Thursday, February 16th at 5 pm
Thaddeus Street Jr. Education Center * Septima Clark Auditorium
25 St. Philip Street, Room 118

origin story: poems by Gary Jackson

origin story outlines a family history of distant sisters, grieving mothers and daughters, and alcoholic fathers. These poems take us from Kansas to Korea and back again in an attempt to reconnect with estranged family and familial ghosts divided by years of diaspora. An interrogation of cultural and personal myths, origin story wrestles with the questions: Who will remember us? How do we deal with the failures of memory? Whose stories are told?

My Soul Is a Witness: The Traumatic Afterlife of Lynching by Mari N. Crabtree

Black southerners often shielded their loved ones from the most painful memories of local lynchings with strategic silences but also told lynching stories about vengeful ghosts or a wrathful God or the deathbed confessions of a lyncher tormented by his past. They protested lynching and its legacies through art and activism, and they mourned those lost to a mob’s fury. They infused a blues element into their lynching narratives to confront traumatic memories and keep the blues at bay, even if just for a spell. Telling their stories troubles the simplistic binary of resistance or submission that has tended to dominate narratives of Black life and reminds us that amid the utter devastation of lynching were glimmers of hope and an affirmation of life.

My Soul Is a Witness traces the long afterlife of lynching in the South through the traumatic memories it left in its wake. She unearths how African American victims and survivors found ways to live through and beyond the horrors of lynching, offering a theory of African American collective trauma and memory rooted in the ironic spirit of the blues sensibility—a spirit of misdirection and cunning that blends joy and pain.

Reading Pleasures: An Evening with Tara A. Bynum

The Conseula Francis Emerging Scholar Lecture presents Tara A. Bynum and Reading Pleasures: Everyday Black Living in Early America

Tuesday, February 7th at 7 pm
Avery Research Center * Senator McKinley Washington Auditorium

 

In the early United States, a Black person committed an act of resistance simply by reading and writing. Yet we overlook that these activities also brought pleasure. In her book, Reading Pleasures: Everyday Black Living in Early America, Tara A. Bynum tells the compelling stories of four early American writers who expressed feeling good despite living while enslaved or only nominally free. The poet Phillis Wheatley delights in writing letters to a friend. Ministers John Marrant and James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw memorialize their love for God. David Walker’s pamphlets ask Black Americans to claim their victory over slavery. Together, their writings reflect the joyous, if messy, humanity inside each of them. This proof of a thriving interior self in pursuit of good feeling forces us to reckon with the fact that Black lives do matter.

CofC Theatre: Home on the Mornin’ Train

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This week, the Department of Theatre and Dance in the College of Charleston School of the Arts will open Kim Hines’ moving drama, Home on the Mornin’ Train.

The kindness of strangers amidst great danger has kept the Underground Railroad alive to this day. In this play, the audience sees the freedom train in action as two stories unfold a hundred years apart. In 1939 as World War II begins, young Jews escaping Germany find inspiration in a book about the journey of young slaves escaping the South, in 1839. Intertwined in their stories are beautiful African American and Jewish songs that speak to a legacy of hope through the ages. Their stories stand as a testament to the unimaginable courage to reach out and help no matter one’s color, one’s beliefs or one’s station in life.

Director and Music Director of the production, Laura Turner, describes the drama, stating, “Unlike most scripts dealing with Slavery or the Holocaust, this play chooses to focus on the brave work done by those willing to risk their lives for freedom. Instead of dwelling on the horrible circumstances of the characters’ situations, this play’s uplifting music and surprising moments of humor, takes the audience on a journey of hope.”

DETAILS: The production will take place Thursday, March 12 through Sunday, March 15 with a second run from Wednesday, March 18 through Sunday, March 22. The performances will take place at the Chapel Theatre, 172 Calhoun St. Performances will begin at 7:30 p.m, except the Sunday shows, which will take place at 3:00 p.m. only. The performances on Saturday, March 14 and Saturday, March 21 will take place at both 3:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 for College of Charleston students, faculty/staff, and senior citizens and $15 for the general public. Tickets can be purchased online at theatre.cofc.edu, or by email or phone (843) 953-6306.

Preservation Planning Studio and Preservation Project Management classes to focus on Mt. Zion A.M.E., Glebe Street, this semester

Content borrowed from: http://blogs.cofc.edu/historic-preservation/2015/01/31/preservation-planning-studio-and-preservation-project-management-classes-to-focus-on-mt-zion-a-m-e-glebe-street-this-semester/

Originally posted on January 31, 2015 by butlercr 

Profs. Ward and Butler are excited to get their classes involved at Mr. Zion A.M.E. Church this Spring. The church is in the midst of the historic college campus but remains a prominent African American Church. Prof. Ward reached out to create a partnership with the church, giving students the opportunity to get in (and under the building) to study its materials, evolution, history, and preservation/ maintenance needs. Preservation Planning Studio students are creating measured drawings for the building, while Preservation Project Planning class will be making repair recommendations and creating a preliminary budget, scope, and schedule to guide future work that the congregation may undertake.
Prof. Ward got the students involved in high tech analysis this week, inviting Chris Morabito with Faro Technologies to demonstrate with 3D scanning of the church interiors.
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The circa 1847 church has weathered a major fire and several hurricanes. It has had several repair campaigns, but retains original character defining features (as well as many materials added during alterations.) Here are some photographs of preliminary investigation on site, and be sure to check back for updates throughout the semester!:

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MLK Jr. Day Speaker: Benjamin Jealous (former NAACP President)

Welcome, we are happy you are here!

MLK Jr. Day Speaker: Benjamin Jealous


Ben Jealous

Please join us for a special talk from Former NAACP President Benjamin Jealous! This event is free for all CofC students, faculty, staff, and the general public. The event will be January 15, at 7:00 PM in the Sotille Theater.

Benjamin Jealous has been a leader of successful state and local movements to ban the death penalty, outlaw racial profiling, defend voting rights, secure marriage equality, and free multiple wrongfully incarcerated people. Under his leadership, the NAACP grew to be the largest civil rights organization online and on mobile, experienced its first multi-year membership growth in 20 years, and became the largest community-based nonpartisan voter registration operation in the country. A builder of robust coalitions, Jealous’ leadership at the NAACP included bringing environmentalist organizations into the fight to protect voting rights, and convincing well-known conservatives to join the NAACP in challenging mass incarceration.

Jealous has been named to the 40 under 40 lists of both Forbes and Time magazines. He is #1 on TheRoot.com’s 2013 list of black leaders under 45.