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Presenting at the Association for Psychological Science Convention

Posted by: Christine Ragusa | June 5, 2017 Comments Off on Presenting at the Association for Psychological Science Convention |

by: Devin McSween

On May 27th, I had the opportunity to travel to Boston, Massachusetts, to present a poster at the Association for Psychological Science’s 29th annual convention based on research I conducted with Dr. Anthony Bishara and Christian Conley. I was awarded the School of Humanities and Social Sciences Student Travel Award which made this amazing opportunity possible.

Traveling to the APS convention marked my first trip to Boston, and though I was only there for a day, the immediate charm of the city made me wish I could have stayed longer. I arrived at the convention early in the morning and had time to sit in on a few talks before our poster presentation in the afternoon. The talks I attended were about current research in the field of industrial/organizational psychology – a field of study particularly interesting to me as I hope to pursue Industrial/Organizational psychology in graduate school. After the talks, I helped set up our poster in the poster presentation room, where nearly 100 other presenters were setting up their posters among the narrow rows. A few interested students and professors stopped at our poster and I had the opportunity to give a brief overview of our research, explain the significance of our findings, and even answer a few follow up questions that they still had. I spent the rest of my day at the convention looking at other students’ poster presentations and listening to them as they explained their research.

Attending the APS annual convention was truly an amazing experience. Not only did I get to hear industrial/organizational psychologists present their work, inspiring me with ideas for my own future research, but I was able to present my own work. I left the convention feeling proud of my research and my ability to present research in front of fellow students, researchers, and professionals. I look forward to continuing research in the field of psychology and for more poster presentations to come. I am very grateful for the School of Humanities and Social Sciences for making my trip to the APS convention possible.

Left to right: Christian Conley, Devin McSween, and Dr. Anthony Bishara

under: Publications

2017: Spoleto Picture a Day 12

Posted by: Christine Ragusa | June 4, 2017 Comments Off on 2017: Spoleto Picture a Day 12 |

by: Bret Lott

Creative Writing Professor Bret Lott is leading the summer, 2017, study abroad program in Spoleto, Italy.

Cari Amici di Spoleto:

School again, though I was sick with some sort of stomach thing for most of the day. This meant postponing my morning class, Tony teaching in the afternoon, and then my doing my shtick in a diminished state in the late afternoon. But classes met, work was accomplished, students wrote.

Then, after classes were over and we’d made a trip down to the Coop, the grocery store at the bottom of the hill (I’ll get some pics from there soon!) for supplies, the students and the Varallos put on a potluck breakfast-for-dinner. Much fun and camaraderie and good food, and that sunset thrown in too.

Ciao—

Colazione-per-cena!

Looking north toward Assisi at sunset, wheat fields down below us.

under: Publications

2017: Spoleto Picture a Day 11

Posted by: Christine Ragusa | June 3, 2017 Comments Off on 2017: Spoleto Picture a Day 11 |

by: Bret Lott

Creative Writing Professor Bret Lott is leading the summer, 2017, study abroad program in Spoleto, Italy.

Buonasera—

No long post today—we’re finally home from Florence and, as usual, one of the students remarked that, though Florence was fun, it sure felt good to get back to a quiet place in the country.

Pictures today of the ride home. Classes resume tomorrow, and they are to have read by then the whole of Bill Bryson’s Neither Here nor There. The photos below show how that turned out on this warm Sunday on the train home to Spoleto.

Ci vediamo!

Liz.

Bryan, doing a little better job of looking like he’s reading.

Brett, not even pretending.

under: Publications

2017: Spoleto Picture a Day 10

Posted by: Christine Ragusa | June 2, 2017 Comments Off on 2017: Spoleto Picture a Day 10 |

by: Bret Lott

Creative Writing Professor Bret Lott is leading the summer, 2017, study abroad program in Spoleto, Italy.

Salve—

We take it easy on the second full day of the Florence trip. Every year before this one, the day begins with the more intrepid of our students climbing up 466 steps to the cupola of the Duomo, but since we were here last, the city has begun a reservation system in order to regulate the number of visitors—a good idea, but, well, we didn’t know about that until we got here, and the first reservation we could have made would have been for Monday. So students did the next best thing: they climbed the 414 steps to the top of Giotto’s Campanile, the belltower beside the Duomo. But after that they were on their own to see the city, to visit museums, to walk and eat and take pictures—that is, to gain an education by their own explorations rather than in a programmed fashion. Below are a few photos from a day spent exploring. We all had fun.

Ciao—

Giotto’s Campanile. Four hundred and eleven steps.

Down a side alley between the Arno and Palazzo Vecchio.

Coffee art made by hand at News Café. Only €1.50.

Marbling paper at Il Papiro.

under: Publications

2017: Spoleto Picture a Day 9

Posted by: Christine Ragusa | June 1, 2017 Comments Off on 2017: Spoleto Picture a Day 9 |

by: Bret Lott

Creative Writing Professor Bret Lott is leading the summer, 2017, study abroad program in Spoleto, Italy.

Saluti!

Today was loaded—and these pictures won’t do much toward sharing the whole experience.

As with each year, the walking tour of Firenze was led by our own Alexandra Lawrence, College of Charleston Class of ‘98, who has been living in Florence for twenty years as an editor and writer and historian and part time tour guide. So accomplished is she with her touring expertise that she led Prince Charles (that guy again!) on his private tour of the city last year; two years before, she gave Beyoncé (a singer of some renown, I am told) her private tour as well. You have to be someone good at what you do to be THE person the city of Florence chooses to guide Prince Charles and Beyoncé both around this place, a fact not lost on the students. They listened, they looked, they learned.

We walked all over the place—approximately five miles, according to the Fitbit—including Piazza della Repubblica, the Palazzo Vecchio, and a visit out onto the Ponte Vecchio, where the students took in the morning stillness of the Arno River. The tour finished with a visit to the Accademia, where Michelangelo’s David stands, and where until only last year they wouldn’t let you take pictures. The building itself, a museum housing not only David but hundreds of other works, primarily sculptures, has an architectural beauty all its own, and I hope no one minds the picture here of the skylight that allows Michelangelo’s masterpiece to be viewed in natural light.

Finally, the day ended in our annual wine-tasting salon with Count Niccolo Capponi, a dear friend of the program who has for years educated us with his insightful candor, keen wit, and elegant spunk on what it means to be a Florentine (his family has lived on the Arno just across from the Uffizi since the 13th century) as well as leading us on a tasty tour of the produce of his family’s winery, Villa Calcinaia. And finally, finally, in his indefatigable generosity, he invited us to his family’s palazzo, that one on the Arno across from the Uffizi, where since the 14th Century his family has been ensconced. There, up in his study, he brought out family artifact after family artifact, and let the students look closely at them, hold them—he allowed them to touch history in a way none of them ever had before. None of them, for instance, had ever held in their hands a document signed by Henry VIII asking the Count’s family to help amass troops for a possible war; and none of them had held a first edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn inscribed to the Count’s great grandmother on the occasion of a visit to the palazzo in 1892.

Afterward, we all went, the Count included, for pizza a couple doors down from his palazzo.

I told you these pictures wouldn’t do the day justice.

Alexandra and students at the Piazza della Repubblicca.

All quiet on the Arno (with the Uffizi on the left; the Count’s palazzo is the three-story orange place on the right).

‘David’ in his rightful light.

Henry VIII’s royal seal, handled by students who can’t believe this is happening: Chris (red hair), Alex, Kaileigh, then the Count holding court, with Caroline and Brett across the way, agog.

Kaileigh with the autographed copy of ‘Huckleberry Finn’ to the Count’s great grandmother—it’s easy to tell how Kaileigh feels about holding this (Kara and Mary are pretty excited too)!

under: Publications

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