#GradStudentLife – A GPMB Student Profile

Ever wonder what students do while working toward a Master of Science in Marine Biology?
Of course there are the classes, labs, tests, seminars, papers, work, studying, networking, etc…add in sample and data collection, data analysis, etc…oh yeah, and then there’s the thesis and defense!

Keilin Gamboa-Salazar is a third-year GPMB student getting ready to finish up the program and shared her research and goals with us.

Keilin is our resident international student from Costa Rica and works in the Reef Fish Section of the SCDNR. Her research focuses on the reproductive biology of Gag and Scamp Grouper. She is investigating the relationship between the number of egg-batches spawned per female, and the age and size of the fish. In addition, she is modeling the probability of spawning for a female, influenced by the age or size of the fish, as well as  any associated environmental variables. This information will shed light on what variables can influence spawning with the ultimate goal of having a better understanding of the reproductive output of the fish stock, and incorporating this knowledge into the regional stock assessments. Keilin first got interested in this research because of the possibility of finding information which would lead to actual change in the way that fisheries are managed, and in that way have an impact on ocean conservation. When not looking through a microscope, Keilin highly enjoys going on research cruises up to 100 miles offshore, where you can see absolutely nothing but water in the horizon. She also enjoys getting to play with all sorts of fishes, and other critters when processing the samples for the Reef Fish lab. She hopes to develop a career in the fisheries which involves offshore cruises, with the ultimate goal of working for the conservation of the oceans. Keilin is currently working on finishing data analyses and writing her thesis, so look out for a thesis defense announcement in January!

Keilin with one of those other critters

Keilin showing off a Snowy Grouper

SCDNR Open House 2017

The SCDNR Open House was this past Saturday, October 21. Every two years SCDNR invites the public to meet and talk with marine biologists, fisheries managers, and educators at the Marine Resources Center plus their partners at the College of Charleston, Hollings Marine Lab, NIST and NOAA.
Guests learned about marine science with informational booths as well as tutorials, tours, crafts and fun family-friendly activities.
We are happy to be a partner for this event and had a great day meeting the community!

GPMB students hosted a touch tank and offered fun crafts for the kids.

GPMB students also had a bake sale and raffle to raise funds for the MBGSA in support of student travel for conferences and events.

Guests were invited inside to see some of the resources of the lab and experience hands-on activities.
Faculty and students presented preserved sharks and fish, live plankton samples and the entire collections room of over 100,000 preserved fish and invertebrate specimens!

Thanks to everyone who made the event a success! It was a great day and we are already looking forward to the next one!

21st Annual Student Research Colloquium

The 21st Annual Student Research Colloquium was held on September 23, 2017. We had another successful event with oral and poster presentations from our Graduate Program in Marine Biology students as well as a graduate student from The Citadel.

Presentations were followed by the keynote address given by Dr. Billie Swalla, Director, Friday Harbor Laboratories, Washington University.

The event was closed with a Lowcountry Boil and introduction of the new GPMB students.

The purpose of the colloquium is three-fold:

  • It gives students the opportunity to present their research in a professional setting and receive feedback from judges and audience members.
  • The presentations are a showcase of the research activities performed by GPMB students and faculty affiliated with the program.
  • Finally, the colloquium is an opportunity for students and faculty to interact and talk about the research activities they are interested in.

You can view the full program, including presentation abstracts here.

2017 Presentation Awards

Congratulations to this year’s presentation winners!

Oral Presentation – 1st Place: Elizabeth Underwood “Investigation of the Salinity Tolerance of the Invasive Island Apple Snail in South Carolina.”

(L to R: Keynote Speaker Dr. Billie Swalla, Underwood, Dr. Karen Burnett, Sigma Xi)

Oral Presentation – 2nd Place: Rachel Leads “Occurrence, Fate, and Effects of Microplastics in the Charleston Harbor Estuary, South Carolina.”

(L to R: Keynote Speaker Dr. Billie Swalla, Leads, Dr. Karen Burnett, Sigma Xi)

Poster Presentation – 1st Place: Teresa Popp “The Reproductive Biology and Ecological Impacts of an Invasive Crab, Petrolisthes armatus

(L to R: Keynote Speaker Dr. Billie Swalla, Popp, Dr. Paul Nolan, Charleston Audubon Society)

Poster Presentation – 2nd Place: Emily Welling “Energetic Response to Feedinga nd Temperature in Juvenile Red Drum, Scianeops ocellatus

(L to R: Keynote Speaker Dr. Billie Swalla, Welling, Dr. Paul Nolan, Charleston Audubon Society)

 

Another great Student Research Colloquium in the books

We would like to thank Dr. Billie Swalla for being our Keynote Speaker!

Thanks also go out to all of the student presenters, committees, faculty and staff who made this event a success!

 

GPMB second-year student Anna Kimelblatt presents her poster titled: ASSESSMENT OF ATLANTIC HORSESHOE CRAB (LIMULUS POLYPHEMUS) NESTING BEACHES AND EGG DENSITIES AVAILABLE TO FEDERALLY THREATENED SHOREBIRDS IN THE ACE BASIN, SOUTH CAROLINA.

GPMB third-year student Nathan Baker begins his oral presentation titled: TEMPORAL CHANGES IN SOUTH ATLANTIC OCEAN FISH BIODIVERSITY.

Keynote Speaker Dr. Billie Swalla with Poster Presenters

Keynote Speaker Dr. Billie Swalla with Oral Presenters

Lowcountry Boil at the SCDNR Outdoor Classroom

Lowcountry Boil at the SCDNR Outdoor Classroom

 

 

2014 Grice Marine-ival

The annual Grice Marine-ival festival took place on Saturday, May 3rd this year and was a great success. Over 100 students, faculty, staff and family members attended, and nearly $300 was raised for the Marine Biology Graduate School Association (MBGSA)! The students won the student vs. faculty volleyball game, and the faculty won the student vs. facutly kickball game. Other events at the festival included a cookout, bake sale, cornhole tournament, fiddler crab races, face painting, water balloon fight, and digging for sharks teeth. marine

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First Ocean Friendly Garden in SC

Ocean Friendly GardensThe Grice Green Teaching Garden puts College of Charleston on the map as home to the first Ocean Friendly Garden in South Carolina. Ocean Friendly Gardens is a national program sponsored by the Surfrider Foundation. It teaches CPR (Conservation, Permeability, and Retention) for landscaping in an effort to prevent storm water runoff from entering the local watersheds. Urban runoff from lawns and hard surfaces is the #1 source of ocean pollution. By using the three important concepts of CPR, we can prevent bacteria, pesticides, fertilizers, sediment, and other harmful pollutants from entering into the ocean. Sharleen Johnson, the MBGSA Green Garden Outreach Coordinator, and Kim Counts of Carolina Clear spearheaded this effort. Ashley Cooper Stormwater Education Consortium also donated signs identifying the native plant species in the garden.

 

 

 

Green Garden Fall Workday

The Marine Biology Graduate students gathered at Grice last weekend for a successful garden workday of planting and garden maintenance.  Although the weather was a little overcast, a lot was accomplished. Projects that took place included planting sweetgrass around the cistern and dune sunflowers around the front sign. The sweetgrass plants were donated by Kim Counts of Carolina Clear. Paty Cowden, the College’s Supervisor of Grounds, donated the dunes sunflowers. Our Green Garden Coordinator, Sharleen Johnson, germinated the seedlings  romaine lettuce and komatsuna for planting in the vegetable bed. After harvesting the existing the sweet potatoes, the group also emptied the compost tumbler  and used this to amend the soil. They planted purple coneflower and brown-eyed susans in the perennial flower bed and replaced the turf grass with fogfruit, a ground  that provides nectar and larval food source for butterflies.