Carter Real Estate Center Director Examines Solutions to Urban Expansion

Recently, Elaine Worzala, Ph.D. was interviewed by Point2 Homes on what growing cities like Toronto should do in order to counter urban density challenges. Is vertical sprawl, horizontal sprawl or missing middle housing the answer? Worzala lends her viewpoint:

For me, it has to be the middle road. People want to live in communities that are comfortable to be in, walkable, safe and enjoyable — where all the services for daily life are relatively close at hand, such as schools, day- or elderly care, grocery shopping, churches, entertainment and recreational areas. Density is not a bad word and it is important as continuous sprawl is clearly unhealthy for all.

For Worzala’s full response and the article in its entirety, read the Point2 Homes article here.

Worzala is a professor of Finance and the director of the Carter Real Estate Center at the College of Charleston School of Business. She earned her undergraduate, master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. An active member of several academic and professional organizations, Worzala has completed projects for the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, International Council of Shopping Centers, Pension Real Estate Association and National Association of Realtors.

BBC News Highlights Hospitality Professor’s Analysis of Airbnb Impact on Communities

Guttentag

With its renowned location in one of the top tourist destinations in the world, the College of Charleston School of Business reinforces its unique position as a leader in the exploration and examination of the tourism industry.

Daniel Guttentag, professor of hospitality and tourism management and director of the Office of Tourism Analysis, recently discussed the impact of peer-to-peer rental giant Airbnb on residents with BBC News. Read the full story >>

“While Airbnb opens up some neighborhoods to more tourists, it has sometimes proved unpopular with existing residents,” says Guttentag.

In his review of several studies specific to Airbnb, Guttentag found that the short-term lettings have both positive and negative effects on communities. These effects include increased profitability for property owners; the expansion of tourism into different parts of a city; and higher rents for adjacent properties.

Guttentag has been at the School of Business since 2017. His research interests include peer-to-peer lodging, volunteer tourism, market segmentation and casino gambling behavior. Under his direction, the Office of Tourism Analysis advises Charleston’s travel industry by providing key tourism data to decision-makers and stakeholders in the city.

Wall Street Journal Features School of Business Real Estate Research

 

Wyman and Mothorpe

Chris Mothorpe, professor of economics at the College of Charleston School of Business recently spoke with The Wall Street Journal about research he and David Wyman, professor of entrepreneurship, published in the Journal of Real Estate Research. In the study, Wyman and Mothorpe found that empty lots located next to power lines sell for 45 percent less than equivalent non-adjacent lots. Read the full story.

Wyman has been with the School of Business since 2013 and also serves as director of the Center for Entrepreneurship. His research interests include real estate and entrepreneurship. Wyman’s work has been published in top peer-reviewed journals including International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, The Appraisal Journal and the Journal of Property Investment and Finance.

Mothorpe has been teaching at the School of Business since 2014. His research interests include urban, regional and environmental economics as well as applied microeconomics. His past research has been published in Real Estate Economics, Regional Science and Urban Economics and The Annals of Regional Science. Mothorpe currently teaches urban economics and microeconomics at the business school.