Economics Major Tackles Gender Inequality With Mentoring App

Caroline "Caty" Greer, College of Charleston School of Business

Caroline "Caty" Greer, College of Charleston School of Business

By Siying Zheng

The Center for Entrepreneurship recently provided a terrific experiential learning opportunity for female student entrepreneurs to compete and earn $1,000 by giving a one-minute pitch about goal five of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals — to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls. The winner of the 2021 contest, Caroline “Caty” Greer ‘23, took the prize for her mentoring app for women called Womentor.

Greer is a junior in the Honors College studying Economics and Data Science. She started her entrepreneurship journey as a freshman when joining the Honors Entrepreneurship Living Learning Community (E-LLC). There, she learned about entrepreneurship theory and practice. Her experience in the E-LLC fostered her passion for creating new and innovative solutions centered around the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

Her winning idea Womentor is a platform for colleges and universities to connect female students with female alumni in the industry they want to enter. Both mentors and mentees can apply by filling in specific criteria such as mentorship and career goals, time commitment and more. The platform would then use artificial intelligence to create meaningful matches for students and alumni.

Greer shared why she is incredibly passionate about this recent venture:

I read so many statistics that highlighted the lack of female representation in positions of corporate power — only 8.1% of Fortune 500 CEOs are women, and 1.2% are women of color. I not only questioned why these numbers were so low but also how they affected other women who want to be CEOs or executives.

One obstacle to high-level female leadership is the lack of role models in the process. In positions usually filled by men, the road to success is lonely, competitive and challenging. Providing young professionals access to successful women in their industry would create both a micro and macro-level impact. That ultimately inspired my venture.

The E-LLC and Impact X have given Greer the skills to develop an idea, validate a venture and tell compelling stories through pitches.

Read more about Caty’s accomplishment on The College Today.

School of Business Named Official University Alliance Partner by CCIM Institute

The Commercial Real Estate Finance (CREF) program at the College of Charleston School of Business is raking in more career-boosting advantages for its ready-to-work students. Recently, the Certified Commercial Investment Member Institute (CCIM) named CofC’s School of Business a university alliance partner for its undergraduate real estate program.

Read More at The College Today.

Local Real Estate Companies Offer Business Students Real-World Experience

The Carter Real Estate Center at the College of Charleston School of Business is infusing experiential learning into its Real Estate Market Analysis course this semester through a collaboration with local real estate firm Carolina Retail Centers and the Charleston office of national commercial brokers, Marcus & Millichap.

Read more about the project at The College Today >>

Carter Real Estate Center Director Examines Solutions to Urban Expansion

Recently, Elaine Worzala, Ph.D. was interviewed by Point2 Homes on what growing cities like Toronto should do in order to counter urban density challenges. Is vertical sprawl, horizontal sprawl or missing middle housing the answer? Worzala lends her viewpoint:

For me, it has to be the middle road. People want to live in communities that are comfortable to be in, walkable, safe and enjoyable — where all the services for daily life are relatively close at hand, such as schools, day- or elderly care, grocery shopping, churches, entertainment and recreational areas. Density is not a bad word and it is important as continuous sprawl is clearly unhealthy for all.

For Worzala’s full response and the article in its entirety, read the Point2 Homes article here.

Worzala is a professor of Finance and the director of the Carter Real Estate Center at the College of Charleston School of Business. She earned her undergraduate, master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. An active member of several academic and professional organizations, Worzala has completed projects for the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, International Council of Shopping Centers, Pension Real Estate Association and National Association of Realtors.

Wall Street Journal Features School of Business Real Estate Research

 

Wyman and Mothorpe

Chris Mothorpe, professor of economics at the College of Charleston School of Business recently spoke with The Wall Street Journal about research he and David Wyman, professor of entrepreneurship, published in the Journal of Real Estate Research. In the study, Wyman and Mothorpe found that empty lots located next to power lines sell for 45 percent less than equivalent non-adjacent lots. Read the full story.

Wyman has been with the School of Business since 2013 and also serves as director of the Center for Entrepreneurship. His research interests include real estate and entrepreneurship. Wyman’s work has been published in top peer-reviewed journals including International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, The Appraisal Journal and the Journal of Property Investment and Finance.

Mothorpe has been teaching at the School of Business since 2014. His research interests include urban, regional and environmental economics as well as applied microeconomics. His past research has been published in Real Estate Economics, Regional Science and Urban Economics and The Annals of Regional Science. Mothorpe currently teaches urban economics and microeconomics at the business school.

School of Business Hosts Retired Boeing SC VP Jack Jones, Names Student Entrepreneur of the Year

The College of Charleston School of Business recently hosted a fireside chat with local businessman Tommy Baker and retired vice president and general manager of Boeing South Carolina Jack Jones during the Fifth-Annual Tommy Baker Entrepreneurship Hour.

At this year’s event, hosted by the business school’s Center for Entrepreneurship and Carter Real Estate Center, Baker interviewed Jones in a sit-down that highlighted his professional journey, as well as his time at the Boeing South Carolina site.

The Tommy Baker Entrepreneurship Hour is named after the well-known Charleston philanthropist, owner and president of Baker Motor Company. The annual event seeks to connect budding and seasoned entrepreneurs alike on hot topics in the industry. A prominent figure at the School of Business, Baker taught a senior-level entrepreneurship class at the College for 22 years before retiring from instructing in 2013. He currently serves on the School’s Board of Governors where he’s been a member for more than 20 years.

“Here at the School of Business, our close ties to the business community allow us to host some of the most distinguished business leaders, such as Jack Jones,” says Alan T. Shao, dean of the School of Business. “During the span of his career, Jack has established himself as an outstanding global business leader, one that our students can look to as a source of inspiration.”

A retired VP and general manager of Boeing South Carolina, Jones oversaw Boeing’s operations and facilities in North Charleston before retiring in 2015.

Prior to joining the Boeing South Carolina team in March 2011, Jones served as vice president of its Everett Delivery Center, overseeing Airplane-on-Ground, Paint, Pre-Flight and Delivery operations for the Boeing wide-body models (747, 767, 777 and 787) assembled in Everett, Wash.

left to right: Tommy Baker; Chad Ross ’18; Jack Jones; and David Wyman, Ph.D.

Jones’ history with Boeing spanned many years. The ops expert began his career with the company as an industrial engineer in 1980 on the 757 Program. He spent time working on several commercial and military programs, including B-2 Stealth Bomber and Air Force One prior to his assignment in Everett.

The Entrepreneurship Hour also included its annual one-minute elevator pitch competition, featuring the finalists for the 2018 Student Entrepreneur of the Year Award. Biology major and entrepreneurship minor Chad Ross ’18 won the $1,000 prize for his business pitch on Chuck Waters Apparel—a clothing line dedicated to providing simple and comfortable clothing while donating proceeds to vulnerable communities everywhere.