Author Archives: kasmana

CofC Alumni on Career Paths with an MS in Math #5

CofC Alumni on Careers in Mathematics: Sonia Kopel

 

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CofC Alumni on Career Paths with an MS in Math #4

CofC Alumni on Careers in Mathematics: Bonny Hardesty, Professor, Polk State College

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CofC Alumni on Career Paths with an MS in Math #3

CofC Alumni on Careers in Mathematics: Thad Sulek, Bank and Forecasting Group, State Farm

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CofC Alumni on Career Paths with an MS in Math #2

CofC Alumni on Careers in Mathematics: Monica Cicciarelli, Math Lab Director, St. Edwards University

 

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CofC Alumni on Career Paths with an MS in Math #1

CofC Alumni on Careers in Mathematics: J .Darby Smith, Postdoctoral Researcher, Sandia National Lab

 

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Congratulations to Student Award Recipients for Spring 2020

The Susan Prazak Award for Future Teachers is given annually in honor of Sue Prazak, who taught at CofC from 1972 to 1999.  This year’s recipient is Andrew Skvarna.

The Ewa Wojcicka Award is our departments top award, given in memory of Professor Wojcicka to a recipient showing exceptional ability, creativity and potential in mathematics.  This year’s recipient of the Wojcicka award is Jay van Raalte.

The Scott Ward Award, given each year to a math major displaying outstanding ability in math and a commitment to connect mathematics to another discipline, goes this year to Michael Lanier.

Outstanding Student Awards went to Katrina Bynum, Terence Carey, Maddos Johnston, Chloe Mattila, Jay Van Raalte,  Blaine Billings, Posy Olivetti, Michael Lanier,  and Shoshana Berkowitz.

Unfortunately, because of the campus closure, there will be no award ceremony or party this year.  But, we are as proud of this award recipients as we ever are and send them our heartiest congratulations!

Keep Up with the Latest Math News and Research

Like most other scheduled events this spring, the College of Charleston’s math colloquium has cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic.  But, if you are missing that weekly dose of interesting cutting-edge math, there are still ways you can get something similar.

Check out Talk Math With Your Friends, a Zoom-based math seminar series very similar to our own colloquium.

Quanta Magazine is a good source for well-researched articles about recent developments in the mathematic sciences.

And, if you’re more advanced, you can also check out the latest preprints posted on the arXiv, a repository of actual research papers.

Princeton Mathematician John Conway Dies of COVID-19

The prolific mathematician John Conway may not be the first but is certainly the most famous mathematician to die from complications related to the current pandemic.  (See this announcement from Princeton University.)

One of the most amazing things that Conway discovered in his long career was a very simple set of rules that reproduce surprisingly life-like behavior.  Click here to read about and here to play his “Game of Life”.

 

Sad News

Professor Ben Cox passed away peacefully on Saturday September 28, 2019 surrounded by his family.  Ben earned his Ph.D. at UC San Diego, under advisor Thomas Enright, where he worked on algebraic methods in representation theory.  He and his wife, math department chair Liz Jurisich, joined the College of Charleston in 1999 and he spent the remainder of his career here, after having held permanent positions at the University of Montana and Lulea University of Technology in Sweden and visiting positions at the University of Saskatchewan, UC San Diego, and UC Santa Cruz.  Ben was a prolific research mathematician and mathematical physicist, publishing over 40 papers in his career.  Through Ben’s generosity in sharing his love of mathematics with others, he supervised over 30 students in independent research, fostered numerous collaborations, and was awarded a five-year Simons Collaboration Grant in 2014 for his collaborative work in conformal field theory.  Early in his career, Ben was awarded a Young Investigators Grant from the National Security Agency and served as a Consultant with the Center for Communications Research in La Jolla, CA.  He led our M.S. in mathematics for seven years and just last year, he was awarded a conference grant, together with co-investigators Anna Calini and Bob Mignone, in Topological Methods in Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence.

Ben was much more than a mathematician, teacher of mathematics, and colleague.  In his quiet and unassuming way, Ben was a talented artist, an avid surfer and swimmer, a devoted husband to Liz and loving father to their daughter Gwen.  With his wry sense of humor, gentle nature, and strong commitment to his purposes in life, Ben always brought laughter and a smile to any room he entered.

A reception to celebrate Ben’s life will be held at Liz and Ben’s home on Saturday, October 5 from three to seven p.m.  Instead of flowers, the family welcomes donations in Ben’s name to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, South Carolina Chapter.