Category Archives: Student News

Afro-Feminism and Resistance in Brazil

Stern Center Ballroom
71 George Street, Charleston, SC
Monday, March 20, 2023
4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
 (ET)
A sociologist, professor, feminist, and Black women’s movement activist. She holds a Master in Social Sciences from the Faculty of Philosophy and Human Sciences of the Federal University of Bahia – FFCH-UFBH. Ms. Reis is the co-founder of the Mahin Collective Black Women’s Organization for Human Rights. She was the General Ombudsman of the Public Defender’s Office of Bahia between 2015-2019 and was elected in 2022 as the 3rd alternate Federal Deputy of the State of Bahia for the Worker’s Party

Should Harvard Still Own My Enslaved Ancestors?

Thaddeus Street Jr. Education Center
Septima P. Clark Auditorium (Rm 118)
25 St. Philip Street, Charleston, SC
Tuesday, March 21, 2023
5:30PM – 7:00 PM(ET)

The Center for the Study of Slavery in Charleston has invited Tamara Lanier to deliver a lecture about her enslaved ancestors, whose naked or partially clothed bodies were forcibly photographed in 1850 outside of Columbia, SC, for a Harvard scientist, Louis Agassiz. Agassiz supported racist theories of polygenesis, and Harvard currently owns these photographs. You may be familiar with the court case Lanier has brought against Harvard to obtain the rights to these images. Her case foregrounds the need for legislation that protects the cultural property of descendants of chattel slavery in the United States. I hope you can attend and hear her speak about the importance of her family’s history and the ethical and legal matters regarding who gets to own, display, and view historical artifacts of slavery.

 

Septima the Play: a Conservation with Dr. Patricia Williams Dockery 

Thaddeus Street Jr. Education Center
Septima P. Clark Auditorium (Rm 118)
25 St. Philip Street, Charleston, SC
Tuesday, March 21, 2023
5:00PM – 6:30 PM (ET)

Join African American Studies affiliate faculty Dr. Nakeisha Daniel and Gary Marshall of the Theatre Department in a conversation with Dr. Patricia Williams Dockery, the former director of the Avery Research Center, regarding her play, SeptimaSeptima, currently showing at PURE Theatre, depicted the life of Septima Clark. Explore Dockery’s process for depicting Septima Clark on the stage and the importance of her life on African American life in Charleston, South Carolina. 

 

Black Studies and the Ethics of Historical Privacy: When Archival Silences Are Acts of Refusal

Join Dr. Mari N. Crabtree with a presentation of her sabbatical research.

Flyer - Dr. Mari N. Crabtree's Sabbatical Presentation: Black Studies and the Ethics of Historical Privacy: When Archival Silences are Acts of Refusal. Thursday, March 23rd, 2023 at 5:00 pm in Room 227, Addlestone Library, 224 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC. Addlestone Library: Room 227
205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC
Thursday, March 23, 2023
5:00 PM – 6:30 PM(ET)

Black Studies scholars often have sought to recover Black voices that have been excluded, marginalized, or erased from mainstream scholarship as a form of reclamation, and as a corrective to research that excludes Black people, and therefore distorts, our understanding of the world in which we live. But what if some of these Black voices don’t want to be found? What claims to privacy do the dead have? This talk offers answers to these questions and will be part of a collection of essays Professor Crabtree is writing on ethical praxis and the craft of writing in Black Studies.

Afro-Latino Travels with Kim Haas

Join the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program in welcoming Kim Hass

Rita Hollings Science Center, Rm 101
College of Charleston
58 Coming Street, Charleston, SC 29401
Wednesday, April 19th
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM(ET)

Kim Haas

Kim Haas is Executive Producer, Host and Creator of Afro-Latino Travels with Kim Haas, a travel show celebrating the African influence in Latin America. She has traveled extensively throughout Latin America. Kim has been active in Afro-Latino issues for more than a decade and is founder of losafrolatinos.com, a blog celebrating Afro Latino culture. Kim speaks fluent Spanish, Italian and Portuguese. Her undergraduate and graduate degrees are in Spanish. Kim is the owner of Haas Media LLC, a multilingual community outreach, translation services, and communications firm located in the greater New York City area.

Septima P. Clark Exhibition Opening

CofC Celebrates Life of Activist Septima Clark With New Exhibit, Mural

Many achievements of Charleston native, educator and activist Septima Poinsette Clark (1898-1987) took place at locations on and near the College of Charleston campus. Clark was born at 105 Wentworth Street in 1898 (now part of the CofC campus) and was a student and later a teacher at the Avery Normal Institute (now the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture at the College of Charleston) at 125 Bull St.. In 1978, the College, during a ceremony in the Cistern Yard, awarded Clark an honorary doctorate in humane letters for 40 years of work as an educator, civil rights leader and advocate for the underprivileged.

Read more at CofC Today

Septima P. Clark Auditorium (Rm 118)
Thaddeus Street Jr Education Center
25 St. Philip Street, Charleston, SC 29401

African American Studies Faculty Book Celebration

Join us as we celebrate recent publications from our African American Studies faculty:

Thursday, February 16th at 5 pm
Thaddeus Street Jr. Education Center * Septima Clark Auditorium
25 St. Philip Street, Room 118

origin story: poems by Gary Jackson

origin story outlines a family history of distant sisters, grieving mothers and daughters, and alcoholic fathers. These poems take us from Kansas to Korea and back again in an attempt to reconnect with estranged family and familial ghosts divided by years of diaspora. An interrogation of cultural and personal myths, origin story wrestles with the questions: Who will remember us? How do we deal with the failures of memory? Whose stories are told?

My Soul Is a Witness: The Traumatic Afterlife of Lynching by Mari N. Crabtree

Black southerners often shielded their loved ones from the most painful memories of local lynchings with strategic silences but also told lynching stories about vengeful ghosts or a wrathful God or the deathbed confessions of a lyncher tormented by his past. They protested lynching and its legacies through art and activism, and they mourned those lost to a mob’s fury. They infused a blues element into their lynching narratives to confront traumatic memories and keep the blues at bay, even if just for a spell. Telling their stories troubles the simplistic binary of resistance or submission that has tended to dominate narratives of Black life and reminds us that amid the utter devastation of lynching were glimmers of hope and an affirmation of life.

My Soul Is a Witness traces the long afterlife of lynching in the South through the traumatic memories it left in its wake. She unearths how African American victims and survivors found ways to live through and beyond the horrors of lynching, offering a theory of African American collective trauma and memory rooted in the ironic spirit of the blues sensibility—a spirit of misdirection and cunning that blends joy and pain.

Reading Pleasures: An Evening with Tara A. Bynum

The Conseula Francis Emerging Scholar Lecture presents Tara A. Bynum and Reading Pleasures: Everyday Black Living in Early America

Tuesday, February 7th at 7 pm
Avery Research Center * Senator McKinley Washington Auditorium

 

In the early United States, a Black person committed an act of resistance simply by reading and writing. Yet we overlook that these activities also brought pleasure. In her book, Reading Pleasures: Everyday Black Living in Early America, Tara A. Bynum tells the compelling stories of four early American writers who expressed feeling good despite living while enslaved or only nominally free. The poet Phillis Wheatley delights in writing letters to a friend. Ministers John Marrant and James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw memorialize their love for God. David Walker’s pamphlets ask Black Americans to claim their victory over slavery. Together, their writings reflect the joyous, if messy, humanity inside each of them. This proof of a thriving interior self in pursuit of good feeling forces us to reckon with the fact that Black lives do matter.

Apply for the NEW internship program in Washington, D.C.

The DC Semester Program for Democracy, Culture, and the Arts (DCSP) is now accepting applications for the Fall 2022 semester! This study away program, which is run by the College of Charleston, provides students who are interested in arts and culture with an opportunity to synthesize their coursework with professional experience at Washington DC-area arts organizations. The program combines a full-time (and often paid) internship in DC (DCSP 395; 6 credits) with a seminar on democracy, culture, and the arts (DCSP 350; 3 credits). Students also take either a 3-credit independent study or a 3-credit online course at the College of Charleston. Combining an internship with coursework has the benefit of helping students build professional contacts and skills while still in school and connecting their academic interests to their professional goals after graduation. For AAST students, the opportunities for arts and culture internships in DC are bountiful—there are dozens of museums, foundations, non-profits, media companies, and government agencies with relevant internships. Also, the African American Studies Program is in the process of allowing DCSP 395 and DCSP 350 to count toward the major and minor in AAST.

Students are responsible for securing an internship in DC, but the DCSP director, Professor Neufeld, and the DCSP associate director, Professor Crabtree, will assist students in identifying internships. Tuition and housing costs are billed like any other tuition and housing costs at CofC, and financial aid still applies. However, there is a program fee of around $800.

If DCSP is of interest to you, please read through the DCSP Info Sheet, which includes an application checklist and application form. If you are interested in DCSP, schedule a meeting with Professor Neufeld (neufeldja@cofc.edu) by mid-February to make sure the program is a good fit for you.

Application Deadline: March 7, 2022

Requirements: Junior or senior status at the time of the program (Fall 2022)