Tag Archives | college of charleston

What IFF?: Transvisibility with Denver Tanner

In spring 2022, student, Marissa Haynes (she/her), launched a new podcast in conjunction with WGS. What IFF? is dedicated to sparking discussion about making change in our campus community and beyond by centering intersectional feminist thought and uplifting members of our community who are actively moving toward justice, and inspiring those of us who want to learn more. What IFF? WGS Podcast

Today we’re revisiting What IFF?’s initial episode where Marissa interviews fellow CofC student, Denver Tanner (they/them). They discuss activism, trans rights and mental health, and so much more. Read a brief excerpt from the episode, and click over to What IFF? to listen to the entire interview!

Excerpt from What IFF?, episode 1 – Transvisibility with Denver Tanner:

MH: How do you feel like the classes that you’ve taken, or the work that you’ve done has prepared you for the life that you dream of?

DT: I think it definitely has . The College has provided me so many great opportunities. I’m actually this year, joining the gardening club, so we’re circling back to the learning how to grow your own food with that one. But academically, one of my favorite projects was my anarchy capstone with Dr. McGinnis for my political science end of the year project. I wrote a thesis paper called Be Gay, Do Crime: An Analysis of Queer Anarchy.

MH: Okay, wow, love that. Queer anarchy? Can you expand on that.

Denver TannerDT: Yes, definitely. So, queer anarchy is, in essence, studying how your identity as a gay person or a trans person, is an act of rebellion against the state. So, for example, in my research for this paper, I learned that the City of Charleston, back in the seventeenth century, used to outlaw dressing of an opposite sex, which obviously is transphobic inherently but even racist as it dates back to origins and not allowing people of a different socioeconomic class to dress as if they were wealthier.

MH: Wow! I love that, too, because what you’re talking about is that this innate just being and walking in life is activism, right? Like, walking and existing as a queer person. That in and of itself is activism. I wanted to ask you: What does it mean to be an activist? What does it take to be an activist?

DT: What a great question! Because if you asked me that a couple weeks ago I would have said, “Oh, I don’t know. I’m not an activist.” But now that I sit here and have this dialogue with you and think about my college experiences and what motivates me every day. I realize: to be an activist, you really just have to care about something. You have to have an identity with something and a passion. And I think activism is much simpler than we perceive it to be, and it really can be a part of your everyday life, just like Women’s and Gender Studies.

Student Spotlight: Patrick Meyer

One of our very favorite things to do is highlight students and their accomplishments! Be sure to check WGS’ Instagram and blog, WGS Connect throughout the semester for more “spotlights.

Below you can read more about Patrick Meyer, who received funding through the WGS Student Opportunities Fund to pursue a summer undergraduate research opportunity with Duke University in 2021!

Patrick Meyer

Patrick Meyer (He/They)

Psychology/WGS ’22

Q. Tell us about the opportunity you had last summer.

I was a 2021 summer research assistant in the Identity and Diversity Lab at Duke University. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the experience was entirely virtual. My primary project over the summer involved developing a theoretical framework to deconstruct harmful masculine norms while fostering authentic identity development in boys and men. This project will hopefully result in a published article in a prominent psychology or gender studies journal!

Q. How did the project influence your understandings of what you had been learning through your coursework in WGS?

This experience deepened so much of the knowledge base I was already cultivating in my WGS classes. Throughout the summer I was able to learn about how systems and individuals uphold and police gender norms, and how this can be particularly distressing for individuals who may not conform to these rigid norms. Sacrificing authenticity for the comfort of conformity demonstrates how patriarchal structures actually end up harming men as well! With the intersectional lens the WGS program has provided me, I also examined how gendered pressure interacts with other axes of power and inequity.

Q. What was the best aspect of this experience?

The most beneficial aspect of this experience was that I was able to foster a connection between my major discipline, psychology, and WGS. The interdisciplinary nature of WGS is one of the things that drew me to the minor and this project showed me how feminist activism and gender equity movements are enhanced by the presence of individuals from diverse backgrounds. In order to deconstruct harmful masculinity norms, it will require the work of educators, mental health professionals, policymakers, and more!

Q. How did the ability to engage in this opportunity influence your next steps and future career goals?

This opportunity allowed me to gain substantial research experience that solidified and expanded my interests in psychology and WGS. I am currently in the process of applying to doctoral programs in counseling psychology, and I am confident that this summer experience will shape so much of my approach to research and practice! The dual-level approach of our framework, deconstructing norms while fostering authenticity, really resonated with me and I hope to become a social change agent that promotes wellness among individuals and across systems.

 

 

WGS Student Opportunities Fund Recipients 2021-2022

WGS Opportunities Fund

WGS is excited to share the 2021-2022 recipients of the WGS Student Opportunities Fund. See what our amazing students have been up to thanks to this funding initiative!

In Spring of 2019, WGS launched the WGS Student Opportunities Fund so that students may apply for funding to support engagement in study abroad, internships, community-based learning projects, and research/scholarly activities. Funding for these opportunities is made possible because of our generous sponsors in the community and on campus.

2021-2022 Recipients:

Marissa Haynes (she/her)

Attended the 2022 Sociologists for Women in Society winter meetings as the social action committee intern.

Patrick Meyer (they/he)

Presented at the 2022 annual conference of the Society for Personality & Social Psychology, poster title: Breaking Down, Pushing Out: An Organizing Framework for Promoting Authenticity and Mitigating Harm Among Boys & Men.

Ahmira Lucas (she/her), Del Lamere (they/them), Jeronimo Ortega (he/el), & Keke Humphrey (she/her)

Organized body positivity event, Every Body Deserves Lovin’ Yoga Class and self-care discussion with Inner Work Instigator, Kennae Miller in April 2022.

Spring 2022 Semester Honors WGS Majors

 

Spring 2022  Semester Honors

Congratulations to our WGS majors who earned academic honors for the Spring 2022 semester!

 

Criteria and Lists (Effective Fall 2015)

President’s List (Highly Distinguished)

  • Student was enrolled in and completed at least 14 semester hours and earned a GPA of 3.800 or higher
  • A student may not have an “I” (Incomplete) or a grade lower than “C” to qualify. No president’s list is released for courses taken during the summer terms.  This honor will be noted on the transcript as “Highly Distinguished.”

Dean’s List (Distinguished)

  • Student was enrolled in and completed at least 14 semester hours and earned a GPA of 3.600 or higher
  • A student may not have an “I” (Incomplete) or a grade lower than “C” to qualify. No dean’s list is released for courses taken during the summer terms.  This honor will be noted on the transcript as “Distinguished.”

 

Introducing WHAT IFF? Podcast

What IFF? WGS Podcast

At What IFF?, we are dedicated to sparking discussion about making change in our campus community and beyond by centering intersectional feminist thought and uplifting members of our community who are actively moving toward justice, and inspiring those of us who want to learn more.

 

 

WGS Summer 2022 Newsletter

WGS Summer Newsletter

WGS is excited to share a special issue of our WGS Connect Newsletter! The first ever summer edition of our newsletter offers highlights from this year’s Feminism in Motion. This year’s fourth annual event featured 28 student presentations/poster presenters as well as roundtable discussions and plenty of artistic doodles.

We hope you enjoy this special issue! WGS is already outlining the next newsletter, and we cannot wait to share the next iteration of WGS Connect this fall! In the meantime, be sure to check this blog site and our social media to keep up-to-date on Women’s and Gender Studies’ current events and spotlights.

WGS would also love to hear from you! Always feel free to reach out with ideas for the blog or newsletter. We embrace all things collaboratively produced and will continue to embody that philosophy in all that we do.

Use the button below to view this special digital PDF, complete with embedded links and lots of great info on WGS students, faculty, events, and more.

Feminism in Motion 2022 Event Recap & Pictures

Feminism in Motion logo

Thank you to everyone who came out to our fourth annual Feminism in Motion celebration! See below for a digitized version of the program, scans of some of the feminist doodles that our attendees created during the event presentations and rich discussions, and pictures from the day’s festivities.

 

 


2022 FeMo Picture Gallery

 


Resources Compiled by Students

Charleston SC

Charleston Housing Resources

Students in WGS’ capstone course worked on a group project about Charleston Housing Resources for their final project. Their project includes a website (https://laineystern.wixsite.com/website) which delves into the issue of housing inequity in Charleston, SC and the root causes of this problem in our local community. In addition, they outline local organizations and resources for those facing housing inequities. We encourage people to view their website to learn more about this issue impacting numerous people in our community.

Capstone Project: Charleston Housing Resources

Charleston SC

Students in WGS’ capstone course worked on a group project about Charleston Housing Resources for their final project. Their project includes a website (https://laineystern.wixsite.com/website) which delves into the issue of housing inequity in Charleston, SC and the root causes of this problem in our local community. In addition, they outline local organizations and resources for those facing housing inequities. We encourage people to view their website to learn more about this issue impacting numerous people in our community.

Summer 2022 Course Brochure

Summer 2022 Courses WGS Summer Courses

Summer fun can include time in the classroom! Take a look at the courses being offered for Maymester, Summer I, and Summer II that are a part of Women’s & Gender Studies.

MAYMESTER

Feminist Pedagogy, WGST 320.01, CRN 31386, Online, Dr. Kris De Welde

Pedagogy is the term used to describe approaches to teaching and learning. In this course we will explore pedagogies that are informed by, for example, feminist, critical, anti-racist, liberatory, and abolitionist perspectives with attention to the ways that students’ education experiences may or may not reflect these approaches. Informed by queer feminist critique of artificial binaries (such as student-teacher) and power dynamics in educational spaces (which reflect broader in/equities), we will consider how engaged and liberation-focused pedagogies can “spill over” beyond classroom spaces into other aspects of our lives. We will engage in reflective practice – individually and in community – to imagine how these approaches can move us toward social justice.

Psychology of Gender, PSYC 350.01, CRN 31322, Online, Dr. Lisa Ross

This course presents social, cognitive, biological, evolutionary and cross-cultural perspectives on gender, including gender development and roles. Major themes include nature and nurture contributions to gender, gender differences versus similarities, gender versus sex, the influence of gender assumptions, biases and roles, and challenging prejudice to improve gender relations.

Psychology of Social Change, PSYC 332.01, CRN 30385, Online, Dr. Jennifer Wright

In a world struggling with a number of serious environmental and social-justice issues, how do we effect social change? How do we create a healthier, cleaner, safer, more compassionate world? How do we, as individuals, become better people? In this class, we will select environmental and social justice issues, and then explore theoretical and empirical perspectives on how our beliefs, reasoning, and emotions–as well as our goals, desires, and fears–positively and negatively influence our attitudes and actions concerning these issues. We will review the literature on habit formation and the ways in which people can effectively change their attitudes and behaviors, both as individuals and as societies. In the process, we will tackle the applied problem of actually enacting change in our own lives.

Women’s Health Issues, HEAL 323.01, CRN 30656, Online, Dr. Christy Kollath-Cattano

The course deals with a wide variety of health issues of concern to women. Major categories of topics include utilization of the health care system, issues of concern to women of diverse backgrounds, normal physiological health and well-being, common physiological and psychological health problems, and cultural as well as societal influences on women’s health.

 

SUMMER I

Human Sexuality, HEAL 217.01, CRN 30947, Online, Dr. Sarah Maness

The format focuses on providing information necessary for establishing a sound knowledge base on topics including sexual anatomy and physiology, birth control, basic psychological concepts of sexuality, sexually transmitted infections, family planning and parenting. The information is presented in relation to the decision-making process as applied to understanding one’s own and others’ sexuality.

 

SUMMER I & SUMMER II

Intro to Women’s & Gender Studies, WGST 200.02, CRN 30744, Online, Dr. Kaj Brian

Intro to Women’s & Gender Studies, WGST 200.01, CRN 30682, Online, Dr. Malia Womack

This is an interdisciplinary course designed to explore the rich body of knowledge developed by and about women and gender. We study gendered structures and their consequences in contemporary cultures and societies. In addition, we examine feminist theories and relevant social movements.

 

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