BBC News Highlights Hospitality Professor’s Analysis of Airbnb Impact on Communities

Guttentag

With its renowned location in one of the top tourist destinations in the world, the College of Charleston School of Business reinforces its unique position as a leader in the exploration and examination of the tourism industry.

Daniel Guttentag, professor of hospitality and tourism management and director of the Office of Tourism Analysis, recently discussed the impact of peer-to-peer rental giant Airbnb on residents with BBC News. Read the full story >>

“While Airbnb opens up some neighborhoods to more tourists, it has sometimes proved unpopular with existing residents,” says Guttentag.

In his review of several studies specific to Airbnb, Guttentag found that the short-term lettings have both positive and negative effects on communities. These effects include increased profitability for property owners; the expansion of tourism into different parts of a city; and higher rents for adjacent properties.

Guttentag has been at the School of Business since 2017. His research interests include peer-to-peer lodging, volunteer tourism, market segmentation and casino gambling behavior. Under his direction, the Office of Tourism Analysis advises Charleston’s travel industry by providing key tourism data to decision-makers and stakeholders in the city.

Wall Street Journal Features School of Business Real Estate Research

 

Wyman and Mothorpe

Chris Mothorpe, professor of economics at the College of Charleston School of Business recently spoke with The Wall Street Journal about research he and David Wyman, professor of entrepreneurship, published in the Journal of Real Estate Research. In the study, Wyman and Mothorpe found that empty lots located next to power lines sell for 45 percent less than equivalent non-adjacent lots. Read the full story.

Wyman has been with the School of Business since 2013 and also serves as director of the Center for Entrepreneurship. His research interests include real estate and entrepreneurship. Wyman’s work has been published in top peer-reviewed journals including International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, The Appraisal Journal and the Journal of Property Investment and Finance.

Mothorpe has been teaching at the School of Business since 2014. His research interests include urban, regional and environmental economics as well as applied microeconomics. His past research has been published in Real Estate Economics, Regional Science and Urban Economics and The Annals of Regional Science. Mothorpe currently teaches urban economics and microeconomics at the business school.

Former CofC President, Supply Chain Professor Re-elected Chair of Baldrige Foundation Board of Directors

The College’s former president, P. George Benson, Ph.D., who currently teaches supply chain classes at the College of Charleston School of Business, has been re-elected as chairman of the Foundation for the Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award for the third consecutive year.

Hailing from Lewisburg, Pennsylvania — home of his alma mater Bucknell University — Benson has an impressive background in higher education.

During his tenure as the 21st president of the College of Charleston, Benson launched the R.E.A.C.H. program, hired a chief diversity officer and established a North Campus to accommodate the growing campus community, among several other achievements.

Ever caught a ride on the Cougar Shuttle or received a Cougar Alert on your phone? You can thank Benson for that. He also acquired state approval for our one-year MBA program, now playing a definitive role in taking business professionals to the next level.

In addition to serving on the board of directors of several companies, including the Baldrige Foundation, he has served as the dean of the University of Georgia Terry College of Business and Rutgers University Business School.  Benson will also be the master of ceremonies for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award Ceremony during the 2018 Quest for Excellence Conference in Baltimore, Maryland on April 8, 2018. This is his sixth and final year as chair of the Foundation and master of ceremonies of the award ceremony.

Benson currently serves on the board alongside William Troy, CEO of the American Society for Quality; Scott McIntyre, president and CEO of PwC Public Sector; and Tony Scott, former CIO of the United States government, among several other industry powerhouses.

Impact Entrepreneurship Visionary Mentors Students Through New Scholars Program

Williams Impact Scholars
Williams scholars in class

Williams speaking to the Stuart M. Williams Impact Scholars

According to Stuart Williams, impact entrepreneur-in-residence at the College of Charleston School of Business, he doesn’t have an “off” switch.

“My brain never shuts down because I’m always thinking about the many things that need to be fixed in the world,” says Williams, founder of impact ecosystems architecture firm, In Place Impact.

But it’s not just the problems of the planet that keep his mind abuzz; it’s their potential solutions as well.

Williams has dedicated a large portion of his professional life to impact entrepreneurship — or, making a difference through profit-based initiatives — and has created a program at the School of Business to inspire the next generation of innovators and problem solvers.

The Stuart M. Williams Impact Scholars program, which officially launched this fall, is designed to provide seven exceptional undergraduate students with the guidance, resources and network to tackle some of the most pressing issues of the 21st century.

“There are so many young people who are truly passionate about affecting change in the best way possible,” says Williams. “I want to give as many students as I can the opportunity to make those dreams a reality.”

Participants in the program have the chance to sharpen their skills through professional development, roundtable dinners, internships and tours of local impact businesses. The Scholars also meet weekly with Williams as well as other mentors and advisors, including Professor David Wyman, Professor Lancie Affonso and MBA candidate Kelly Muxworthy to discuss their respective impact projects.

The 2017 Stuart M. Williams Impact Scholars are Latosha Andrade, Mya Belden, Carlie Christenson, Kionnie Epps, Catherine Hill, Sofia Troya and Brandon Williams.

The impressive inaugural cohort, which was selected after a rigorous application and Williams Impact Scholarsinterview process, is comprised of freshmen and juniors from a diverse range of disciplines, including business, public health, political science and criminal justice.

Some of the young innovators have already launched exceedingly successful businesses, says Williams. All of them have incredible personal stories and achievements: one student carried more than 50 credits into college from high school; one came all the way from Ecuador to learn how to solve the problems in her country; and, one spent more than five years serving in the military.

Students in the program are looking to take on various social and economic issues such as eradicating poverty, improving supply chain sustainability in the coffee industry and ensuring quality primary school education for children.

“It’s all about impacting in a way that is fulfilling for you,” Williams told students at one of their first meetings.

What seems to fulfill Williams is ensuring that the School of Business is properly positioned to become one of the nation’s leading academic institutions offering impact studies.

Williams is a noticeable presence at the school, not only through his new scholars program but also through the ICAT program and the Center for Entrepreneurship. He has also successfully helped the School integrate impact studies into many of its classes.

The business school was honored to have Williams join its board of governors this year. “We owe a great deal to Stuart here at the School of Business and are thrilled he has joined our Board,” says Alan T. Shao, dean of the School of Business. “His passion for impact studies paired with his commitment to further the strategic goals of this institution have paved the way for our students to become the socially and environmentally responsible business leaders of tomorrow.”

With no “off” switch in sight for Williams and the students he continues to inspire, it’s safe to say the biggest impact is yet to come.