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The School of Business and The Initiative for Public Choice and Market Process invites John Cerasuolo, the chairman of the Beacon Center of Tennessee, and president and CEO of ADS Security, as a part of its BB&T Free Market Process Speaker Series.  On Tuesday, October 7, Cerasuolo will discuss the role of business leaders in preserving a free society.

 

The feature presentation will be held at the School of Business, 5 Liberty Street, Charleston, in the Beatty Center Wells Fargo Auditorium, from at 1:40 – 3:00 p.m.  This event is open to students, the business community, media, and other Charleston area residents.

The event is co-sponsored by the Initiative for Public Choice and Market Process, the Schottland Scholars Program, and MGMT 345: Leadership and Management Development.

About John Cerasuolo
John Cerasuolo is the chairman of the Beacon Center of Tennessee. He serves as President and Chief Executive Officer of ADS Security, which he joined in 2008. ADS Security is the 25th largest security firm in the United States and is headquartered in Nashville, Tennessee serving the southeastern United States. The security industry leader has received several notable recognitions including being Honeywell’s four-time National Dealer of the Year. Mr. Cerasuolo recently served as the Vice President of AFL Network Services headquartered in Franklin, Tennessee. In this capacity, Mr. Cerasuolo led a division with 1,300 employees across 35 locations. He began his career as a Naval Officer in the United States Navy’s Nuclear Engineering Program. Mr. Cerasuolo earned his Bachelor of Science degree from the United States Naval Academy in 1983 and a Masters of Business Administration degree in 1995 from Clemson University.  He serves on the Board of Overseers of the Atlas Economic Research Foundation.

Five College of Charleston School of Business students were awarded scholarships at this week’s 41st annual S.C. International Trade Conference (SCITC). This is the second consecutive year that College of Charleston students have swept SCITC scholarship awards.

Each year, the SCITC presents scholarships to students in memory of Mrs. Margaret A. Patrick, who was instrumental in the development of the annual trade conference and its strong support of transportation education, and in memory of W. Don Welch, the former executive director of the South Carolina Ports Authority. Five scholarships, ranging from $1,000 to $2,500, were awarded at the 2014 conference held at the Wild Dunes Resort with more than 400 attendees from across the state and southeast region.

All students from South Carolina colleges and universities were invited to participate in the competitive

Featured L-R: Dr. Rene Mueller, director of the Global Business Resource Center and Global Scholars Program with scholarship recipients Kornelia Kostka, Krystyna Rastorguieva, Lauren Hackler, and April Henry. Not shown: Ryan Faucher.

Featured L-R: Dr. Rene Mueller, director of the Global Business Resource Center and Global Scholars Program with scholarship recipients Kornelia Kostka, Krystyna Rastorguieva, Lauren Hackler, and April Henry. Not shown: Ryan Faucher.

application process. The winners were selected based on a proven interest or experience in international trade or related area, academic standing and performance, a personal narrative, letter(s) of recommendation, honors and extracurricular activities.

  • Krystyna Rastorguieva, international business major (Don Welch Scholarship sponsored by the S.C. International Trade Conference Board of Directors in the amount of $2,500);
  • Kornelia Kostka, double major in international business and finance (Margaret A. Patrick Scholarship sponsored by the S.C. International Trade Conference Board of Directors in the amount of $2,500);
  • April Henry, international business major (scholarship sponsored by the Propeller Club of South Carolina in the amount of $1,500);
  • Ryan Faucher, international business major and Honors College student (Customs Broker and Freight Forwarder Scholarship in the amount of $1,000); and
  • Lauren Hackler, economics major with minors in French and international studies (scholarship sponsored by the Butler C. Derrick, Jr. Memorial Scholarship Fund in the amount of $1,000).

“This scholarship has provided me with additional motivation to expand my horizons and work even harder to develop my skillset as a student,” says Kostka. “Balancing athletic and academic obligations while finding time for extracurricular activities can be challenging, so I am very thankful for South Carolina International Trade Conference’s support as I aspire to reach my goals.”

“I am extremely proud that, for the last two years, our business students have swept the South Carolina International Trade Conference scholarship awards,” says Rene Mueller, director of College of Charleston’s Global Business Resource Center and Global Scholars Program, and professor of marketing. “I am constantly amazed at the impressive academic and work backgrounds of the students. Not only do these students have impressive GPAs but they also have extensive work and extracurricular experiences. They have studied abroad, participated in service learning programs, and have taken advantage of international trade internships. The scholarship awards are well deserved.”

About the School of Business
College of Charleston’s School of Business offers seven undergraduate majors and several interdisciplinary concentrations, an honors program in business, an M.S. in Accountancy and an MBA.  Approximately 2000 undergraduate and graduate students attend from as far away as China, Germany and Brazil. The faculty has research expertise in areas such as global logistics, hospitality and tourism, political economics, financial investment, bankruptcy, business intelligence, real estate, and sustainable business practices. Visit http://sb.cofc.edu/to learn more about our students’ achievements, undergraduate and graduate programs, faculty and Centers of Excellence.

About the College

The College of Charleston is a public liberal arts and sciences university located in the heart of historic Charleston, South Carolina. Founded in 1770, the College is among the nation’s top universities for quality education, student life and affordability. With more than 11,000 students, the College of Charleston offers the distinctive combination of a beautiful and historic campus, modern facilities and cutting-edge programs.

 

On Saturday, September 27, 2014, NBC Today Show financial editor Jean Chatzky will talk about

Jean Chatzky, Author and Financial Editor, The Today Show on NBC

Jean Chatzky, Author and Financial Editor, The Today Show on NBC

“Making Money Make Sense” in the College of Charleston School of Business. Chatzky will talk about the importance of proactively managing your money, why debt is dangerous and how to avoid financial pitfalls. The free event will take place at 5 p.m. in the Beatty Center’s Wells Fargo Auditorium (5 Liberty St.).

In addition to her role on the Today Show, Chatzky is an author, motivational speaker, and has given personal financial advice on Oprah, Live with Regis and Kelly and The View, among others. She started her career in 1986 at Working Women, knowing that she wanted to be a financial journalist. She left after two years taking at Dean Witter Reynolds before moving to Forbes. She is the author of The Difference: How Anyone Can Prosper in Even The Toughest Times (March 2009), Make Money, Not Excuses (March 2008), Pay It Down: From Debt to Wealth on $10 A Day (January 2006), The Ten Commandments of Financial Happiness (January 2005) and Talking Money (January 2001).

Link to original article on The College Today.

It’s one thing to organize and analyze the vast streams of computer data that many businesses and organizations collect by the terabyte. But what does it all mean? And how can organizations use this information to improve their performance and boost their bottom line?

That’s where an expert like Chen-Huei Chou comes in. An Associate professor in the new Department of Supply Chain and Information Management in the School of Business, Chou has been teaching at the College of Charleston since 2008.

RELATED: Learn more about the Department of Supply Chain and Information Management.

Chen-Huei Chou

Chou’s academic background in computer science, information systems and business are reflected in his research. He has studied everything from abuse of the Internet in the workplace to the usefulness of state emergency management websites. He’s also adept at teaching information management concepts to students, as demonstrated by the Distinguished Teaching Award he received from the School of Business in 2013.

Fresh off a busy summer of travel, research and speaking engagements, Chou recently answered a few questions for The College Today.

Q: What is your academic background?

A: Before joining the College of Charleston, I received higher education in both Taiwan and the United States. I have an academic background in two completely different fields: one in engineering and one in business. I received a B.S. in Information and Computer Engineering from Chung Yuan Christian University, Taiwan, and a M.S. in Computer Science and Information Engineering from National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan. After working for Acer, Inc. as a senior computer engineer for two years, I came to the U.S. and received an M.B.A. from the University of Illinois at Chicago and a Ph.D. in Management Information Systems from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Q: What are your research interests?

A: My areas of interests include Web design issues in disaster management, ontology development, data mining, text mining, knowledge management, Internet abuse detection and software testing. I’ve published, including forthcoming, 17 peer-reviewed journal articles in the past six years. Several of the manuscripts have been published in top-ranked journals. For example, I have a forthcoming paper entitled “Ontology-based Design and Evaluation of Natural Disaster Management Websites: Tools and Applications” to appear in MIS Quarterly, which is the No. 1-ranked journal in Management Information Systems.

RELATED: Read an abstract of Chou’s forthcoming research article in MIS Quarterly.

Q: What are your expectations and hopes for the new Department of Supply Chain and Information Management, and why is it an important field of study for business students?

A: More than ever before, effective supply chain management involves the collection, distribution and analysis of complex information. This evolutionary trend is occurring in many other functions of the firm as well. As such, the knowledge and skill requirements for success in business have evolved to include information management and analysis for problem solving, and the ability to use technology to execute business activities. These changes have made it very important for business students from all functional backgrounds to study information systems. Our hope and expectation is that the new Department of Supply Chain and Information Management will be the go-to area for obtaining rigorous information management training that will complement the existing programs in the School of Business and will add value to all our business students.

Q: You had a busy summer working on research projects, delivering a keynote speech and attending international conferences. Tell us about these activities?

servers-embedA: In July, I was invited to offer a keynote speech at the International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management in Bangkok, Thailand. In this speech, I shared my knowledge and experience in conducting a text mining approach for detecting Internet abuse in the workplace. As the use of the Internet in organizations continues to grow, so does Internet abuse in the workplace. Internet abuse activities by employees — such as online chatting, gaming, investing, shopping, illegal downloading, pornography and cybersex — and online crimes are inflicting severe costs on organizations in terms of productivity losses, resource wasting, security risks and legal liabilities.

This summer I also attended two international conferences to report on recent research. At the International Conference on Information Management, I presented the findings of a study co-worked with a professor in Taiwan. This study, entitled “Examination of Team Performance Predictors: A Data Mining Approach,” aims to use data mining to identify team personality traits related to team performance. We found that conscientiousness and neuroticism traits were highly ranked by three filter methods. Our findings potentially contribute to the development of human resource management academically and practically.

At the International Conference on Computational Intelligence and Applications held in Chengdu, China, I presented the topic “Functional Validation and Test Automation for Android Apps.” Android open source mobile operating systems have been used by major smartphone manufacturing companies. Its market share exceeded 80 percent in the third quarter of 2013. During the presentation, I presented proposed test cases for performing system testing, compatibility testing and automated stress testing of Android apps.

Q: Some of your work in management information systems is focused on disaster preparedness and emergency response websites. How can this research lead to improvements in these systems and benefit public safety?

HurricanhugoA: Local and state natural disaster management (NDM) websites play an important role in assisting people through various disaster stages such as general preparation, preparation for a coming/predicted disaster, disaster in progress and response, recovery, and learning and mitigation. However, such websites are complex and there is little research on standards and guidelines for developing and evaluating them. In a project co-worked with two professors at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, we developed an ontology-based evaluation tool to assess the utility of NDM websites. Two main groups of stakeholders — experts who are in charge of NDM websites and potential users of such websites — contributed to the process.

The practical usefulness of our work has been demonstrated in its use to assess the online readiness of all 50 U.S. states. Our analysis of NDM websites revealed a lack of preparation by most states. This is stunning given the fact that websites have become a common channel of communication to reach the public asynchronously. Our work identified the areas of weakness for each state in the five stages of NDM. This work can be used to enhance the websites of the states and assist in prioritizing the areas that need improvement.

Re-posted from:
http://today.cofc.edu/2014/09/16/data-mining-professor-analyzes-digital-information-improve-business-practices/

The Office of Economic Analysis and the Office of Tourism Analysis  forecast that occupancy rates in Charleston will remain steady through the rest of 2014 and 2015.  Frank Hefner, Ph.D., professor of economics, and director of the Office of Economic Analysis, forecasts that occupancy rates for peninsula hotels should remain at 80.5% for the rest of 2014, and are predicted to be 80.1% in 2015.

Bing Pan, Ph.D., associate professor of hospitality and tourism management, and head of research for the Office of Tourism Analysis,  added that given the increase of 304 hotel rooms, the roomnights sold in peninsula will rise slightly in 2015. Occupancy rates for surrounding Charleston County should remain at 74.5% for the rest of 2014, and are predicted to be 74.7% in 2015.

The average daily rate for hotel rooms on the peninsula is predicted to rise slightly, from an average of $188.72 in 2014 with continued growth to $194.17 in 2015.  In surrounding Charleston County, the average daily rate is predicted to increase from $136.66 in 2014 to $143.49 in 2015.

For more information, please contact:

Bing Pan, Ph.D.
, Head of Research, Office of Tourism Analysis
Associate Professor, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management
School of Business, College of Charleston

Work: 843-953-2025
Mobile Phone: 843-608-9188
Email: [email protected]

Managing a hostel in Ghana for NGO workers, operating the food and beverage departments at the DoubleTree by Hilton Amsterdam Centraal Station, creating sales and marketing strategies for the Brisbane Bandits of the Australia Baseball League. In today’s global marketplace, these types of internship experiences on a student’s resume are likely to get him or her noticed in the $2 trillion global tourism industry. Unfortunately, not every student is able to afford these opportunities.
Michael and Tania Cahill, parents of Isabel ’14, were inspired by their daughter’s experiential learning through the hospitality and tourism management (HTMT) program.  During the summer before Isabel’s sophomore year, she worked at a hotel in Montreal.  The following summer, she interned at a hotel in Amsterdam.

“We realize the value of those experiences and wanted to make similar opportunities available for other hospitality and tourism students who might not otherwise be able to afford it,” says Michael Cahill.

In June 2014, the couple created the Cahill HTMT International Internship Award to enable one undergraduate student annually to participate in an extraordinary internship abroad.  The Cahill gift also advances the School of Business’ mission to incorporate global learning into students’ experiences.

The first award recipient will be selected this fall by departmental faculty. Students can use the award to meet a variety of needs, such as travel, fees related to the visa process, tuition, and living expenses.

“The Cahill HTMT International Internship Award aligns with our emphasis on industry partnerships, the desire of our students to work and study internationally, and the mission of the College to foster distinctive opportunities and relationships around the world,” says Brumby McLeod, assistant professor of hospitality and tourism management.

Both Tania and Michael have “outside” perspectives on the impact of their gift.  Tania, a native of Holland and Michael, originally from Canada, see how it will influence a student’s outlook and career success in a life-changing way.

“International internships will better equip students at the College of Charleston to participate in the global economy alongside students from Europe, Asia and elsewhere,” says Cahill. “Dean Shao, Dr. Frash and Dr. McLeod have clearly focused on these initiatives as an important part of a good education and we’re glad to be a part of their vision.”

In addition to working abroad, the recipient will be encouraged to live with a local family.  A home-stay arrangement allows the student to be deeply exposed to the area’s people and lifestyles.

“Our hope is that wherever a student lands an international internship, that he or she soaks up the unique culture by meeting, socializing and living with the local population,” says Cahill.

In today’s borderless business world, international work experience is more than an added bonus on a student’s resume. It’s the differentiating factor that will be made possible for several HTMT students, thanks to the generosity and global vision of Michael and Tania Cahill.

With the finance major heading into its second year and the new supply chain and information management program beginning this fall, the number of students who are excited about job prospects in these fields is increasing.

Industry leaders like Marco Wirtz, president and CEO of Daimler Vans Manufacturing, see the value of these two programs and how investing in our students can enhance the educational experience offered at the College of Charleston and benefit our region’s high-growth economy.

In April, Daimler Vans Manufacturing LLC. created the Daimler Vans Scholars Program with a $163,000 pledge to help support highly motivated students who are preparing for careers in supply chain management or finance. Wirtz, a member of the School of Business Board of Governors, was instrumental in designing the program and advocating for Daimler’s generous commitment.

“I see the College of Charleston School of Business as a valuable source of talent to join Daimler Vans Manufacturing, particularly in the areas of supply chain management and finance,” says Wirtz.  “The faculty is closely aligned with the business community and has designed the academic programs to be rigorous and relevant to the needs of the job market.”

Rising junior, Blair Healey was inspired by Dr. Marvin Gonzales to learn more about supply chain management in a decision sciences class when he connected the power of data on driving business decisions and efficiency, especially in manufacturing environments. Healy’s experience learning about supply chain management and its importance in industry has motivated him to focus the next two years studying in the discipline.  He was selected by Joshua Davis, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Supply Chain and Information Management and associate professor, as one of two inaugural Daimler Vans Scholars.  Each recipient will receive a prestigious scholarship during their junior and senior years and will also be offered unique opportunities to meet DVM leadership and be exposed to the company.

“The Daimler Vans scholarship will lead directly to advancement in my career. It will lighten the financial burden of college and enable me to focus more whole-heartedly on my education in supply chain management,” says Healey.  “As a Daimler Vans Scholar, I also have invaluable connections into the manufacturing industry, such as Marco Wirtz, to give me more comprehensive knowledge in a competitive field.”

The NASBITE™ Certified Global Business Professional™ (CGBP™) two-day training course will be offered through the Global Business Resource Center on Friday, September 26 and Saturday, September 27 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. each day.  The course serves as a preparation for those who want to take the national certification exam during the upcoming exam window of December 1 – 23, 2014.

Course content covers each of the four knowledge domains tested in the national exam: global business management, global marketing, global supply chain management and international trade finance. All classes will be taught by the College’s own CGBP-certified and NASBITE-certified faculty members.

The two-day course will be held at the College of Charleston School of Business, 5 Liberty St, in the Tate Center, Room 202.

The cost for the two, full-day course is $395.  Each half day is $125.  College of Charleston alumni and members of the Global Business Resource Center partner organizations receive a discounted price of $295 for both days and $75 for each half-day session.

Contact Mary Katharine Bowen at [email protected], 843.953.6621, to inquire about the program and certification and register for the course.

The Business Research Guide (BRG) has named the College of Charleston School of Business one of the top 30 business schools in the U.S. for study business abroad.

The School of Business is ranked number 15 on the list following a survey of global business and study abroad programs at prominent universities, and ahead of many prestigious business schools at the University of Michigan, Columbia University, University of Notre Dame, and other universities.

According to BRG, schools were selected based on, “commitment to excellence in international business education, their variety of study abroad options for full and part-time students, and their focus on global exchange with educational institutions across the globe.”

BRG wrote that the School of Business “encourages students to participate in a number of study abroad programs ranging from short-term to long-term study”. The publication also notes that scholarships are frequently given to students for international travel and winter and spring semester trips

Alan T. Shao, Dean, College of Charleston School of Business

Alan T. Shao, Dean, College of Charleston School of Business

“To effectively educate our students, we need to show them that the world is our market, not just the United States. Since the U.S. makes up less than 5% of the world’s population, we want our business students to go see, experience and study different economies and cultures,” says Alan T. Shao, dean of the School of Business.  “With Charleston’s emergence on the world stage, we are also serving the economic needs of our region.”

Last year, the College of Charleston School of Business sent 289 students abroad including all international business students, global logistic students and MBA students.

Rob Hare, a rising junior at the College of Charleston recently took advantage of the program.

“I first learned of the the study abroad opportunity in Panama a few days after writing a paper on the impact the Panama Canal expansion project could have on the Port of Charleston,” says Hare. “I saw a flyer advertising the study abroad program and thought it would be a great way to see first hand the scope of the project and its potential impact. This program provided opportunities to make connections with industry professionals in Panama as well as a forge bonds with fellow students and professors.”

Students are not the only ones taking advantage of the study abroad program. Last year, nine faculty members in the School of Business taught courses overseas.

About the School of Business
College of Charleston’s School of Business offers seven undergraduate majors and several interdisciplinary concentrations, an honors program in business, an M.S. in Accountancy and an MBA.  Approximately 2000 undergraduate and graduate students attend from as far away as China, Germany and Brazil. The faculty has research expertise in areas such as global logistics, hospitality and tourism, political economics, financial investment, bankruptcy, business intelligence, real estate, and sustainable business practices. Visit http://sb.cofc.edu/to learn more about our students’ achievements, undergraduate and graduate programs, faculty and Centers of Excellence.

About the College
The College of Charleston is a public liberal arts and sciences university located in the heart
of historic Charleston, South Carolina. Founded in 1770, the College is among the nation’s top
universities for quality education, student life and affordability. With more than 11,000 students,
the College of Charleston offers the distinctive combination of a beautiful and historic campus,
modern facilities and cutting-edge programs.

 

Dr. Elaine Worzala, director, Carter Real Estate Center

Dr. Elaine Worzala, director, Carter Real Estate Center

The Society of Industrial and Office Realtors featured an article written by Elaine Worzala, director of the Carter Real Estate Center and professor of real estate, and her former student, James Stanton ’14, on the importance of including real estate education at the undergraduate level.  The College of Charleston School of Business is one of only a handful of universities in the U.S. to offer an undergraduate minor in real estate.

The article, The Four R’s: Reading, Riting, Rithmatic, and Real Estate, was featured in the Society’s Summer 2014 edition.