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CofC Business Hours During Remote Learning Period

The following list of campus offices will be open and staffed during the remote learning period beginning on Tuesday, August 25. As noted below, some offices will maintain normal operating hours from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, but all listed locations will, at a minimum, be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. during the remote learning period.  

  • President’s Office
  • Academic Affairs
    • Addlestone Library (Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 12:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Saturday, closed for deep cleaning)
    • Deans’ offices
    • Provost’s Office
    • Academic Experience (shared consultation kiosk with Registrar outside Lightsey Center)
    • Registrar (shared consultation kiosk with Academic Experience outside Lightsey Center)
    • Center for International Education
  • Admissions
    • Visitor Center
    • Financial Aid
    • Veterans Affairs
  • Information Technology
    • IT Service Desk (Walk-in at Bell Building 525: Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
    • By phone at 843.953.3375 or chat (https://chat.help.cofc.edu) Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m.
    • Email at itservicedesk@cofc.edu
  • Business Affairs
    • Treasurer’s Office
    • Campus Services HQ (8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
    • Copy Center
    • Mail Services (8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
    • Human Resources
    • Central Stores (on-site in North Charleston, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.)
    • Payroll
  • Athletics
    • TD Arena Offices
  • Student Affairs (NOTE: Call 843.953.5522 for access to Stern Student Center, if you need to meet with a staff member)
    • Student Affairs administration (8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
    • Higdon Center
    • Career Center
    • Multicultural Student Programs and Services (8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
    • Dean of Students (8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
    • Student Health Services (8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
    • Residence Life (8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
    • Collegiate Recovery (8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
    • Cougar Pantry (by appointment, 843.953.2291)
  • Facilities Management
    • Shop Support (7 a.m. to 5 p.m., 24-hour support for emergencies)
  • Public Safety
    • Police and Fire (24-hour support)

Please note: At this time, the vast majority of faculty and staff will still work remotely, to the extent possible.   

Employees have already or should expect directives from their supervisors and will receive written follow-up communications from supervisors and/or division heads regarding individual staffing and work schedules.

Please read the announcement from Dr. Hsu on August 24, 2020 for more information. 

Welcome Class of 2024!

By Academic Affairs
Posted on 24 August 2020 | 2:01 pm — 

More than 2,200 new students from around the country and around the world will start their undergraduate careers at the College of Charleston this month as part of the Class of 2024. This cohort includes individuals from 45 U.S. states, districts and territories, as well as international students from a host of countries such as Australia, Denmark and Gambia.

Among this new crowd are seven sets of twins, numerous high school valedictorians and plenty of students with an enterprising spirit. They are seeking preparation for careers in medicine, technology, business and education, as well as myriad of other professions. Some are entrepreneurs. Some are innovators. Some are thought leaders. And all of them are intent on getting a strong background for making their mark on the world.

Read more about the Class of 2024 at https://today.cofc.edu/2020/08/19/model-students-meet-seven-members-of-the-class-of-2024/.

Resilient Teaching and Learning at CofC

By Academic Affairs
Posted on 10 August 2020 | 1:54 pm — 

As you are preparing to teach in our new environment, this Resilient Teaching site will offer suggestions of how you can plan for the unexpected, whether that be COVID quarantine or hurricane evacuation.  “Resilient teaching” refers to adaptive behaviors used to develop a course for maximum flexibility.  The phrase takes its lead from Inside Higher Ed, where researchers have been identifying key strategies that empower teachers to face shifting learning environments.

The College of Charleston’s Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education curriculum serves all students, regardless of major, and assures that students are exposed to a breadth of intellectual inquiry distributed across seven areas: First Year Writing, Foreign Languages, Classical or Modern, History, Humanities, Mathematics/Logic, Natural Science, and Social Sciences. Aside from exposing students to the research topics and methods of the various disciplines, General Education courses engage students in conversations and concepts that are important to responsible citizens of contemporary society. Every course will approach these big ideas differently, in ways appropriate to that discipline and the course context.

Engaging the idea of diversity

The following General Education courses being taught in Fall 2020 intentionally engage with the idea of diversity. The definition, context, and relevant content will change from course to course, but in each one students will discuss diversity as it is understood in that discipline and consider how those ideas can be applied outside the classroom. (See the college catalog for the official course descriptions and for the General Education requirement they fulfill. Read more about these courses at https://academicaffairs.cofc.edu/generaleducation/focus.)

Fall 2020 Offerings

ARTH 101 History of Art: Prehistoric Through Medieval.

This course explores diversity through the study of the visual arts and architecture from the civilizations of the geographical and cultural areas today we know as Europe, Anatolia, the Middle East, and North Africa from the Prehistoric period to the Middle Ages. In this course, students discuss all related aspects which “affect” the art or are affected by art such as religion and religious rituals, politics, daily life requirements, ethnicity, cultural differences, geographical conditions etc. This course will enable the student to identify, analyze and interpret works of art/architecture in a diverse array of traditions.

ARTH 290-04: Special Topics: The Art and Architecture of Mesopotamia and the Ancient Near East

This course investigates the material culture of the civilizations who lived throughout the Eastern Mediterranean and Mesopotamia from the Neolithic period to the Achaemenid Persian Empire.  We will investigate how these different peoples interacted with one another over time and in doing so consider questions of identity.  How did ancient Near Easterners understand their cultural and ethnic differences?  How did these differences influence ancient society and manifest in art and architecture?

CLAS 303/HIST 370

The Greeks, Romans, and Egyptians who inhabited ancient Alexandria followed radically different religious, social, cultural, and economic practices, yet were bound together by their identification as “Alexandrians.” Was this just a geographical description, or did it mean something special to be “Alexandrian”? This course examines relationships and intersections of Alexandria’s communities, whose interactions varied from peaceful to tense to openly violent, and explores the ways in which this diverse community forged a sense of shared identity.

DANC 331: History of Western Dance

This course focuses not just on dance history, but prompts larger conversations about gender disparity in the dance world, sexual harassment and systemic abuses of power, issues of racial and class inequality in opportunities for dance training and performances, and how certain dances reinforces these ideas. These issues have existed since the beginnings of western dance and unfortunately still continue to this day.

ENGL 290: Illness Narratives

Illness does not exist in a vacuum, so factors like neurodiversity, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender are important to consider when we read stories about mental or physical dis-ease. Some important readings include Jenny Lawson’s Furiously Happy (a book about depression and anxiety), Susan Nussbaum’s Good Kings, Bad Kings, (about disability and also sexuality), and The Sprit Catches You and You Fall Down, about ethnicity and cultural competence.  We also will be working with diverse members of our community as we hear the stories of hospice patients.

HONS 175 – 01 Approaches to Religion: Making Believe and Making Belief in the Study of Religion

This honors course introduces students to the academic study of religion as a social-cultural phenomenon. Focusing primarily on analytical and methodological approaches drawn from the discipline of Performance Studies, we examine the central importance of embodied practices (rituals, microrituals, habits, comportments) for the development of “religious” consciousness. We examine historical and ethnographic accounts drawn from diverse cultural contexts including: Southeast Asian Buddhism, Euro-American Protestantism, and Haitian Vodou in order to illuminate the various ways that humans make sense of the cosmos.

LACS 101: Introduction to Latin American and Caribbean Studies

The main student learning outcome for this course is for students to demonstrate an understanding of the diversity and complexity of the Latin American and/or Caribbean experiences as well as look at the Latino experience in the United States. The course debunks the myths about the region perpetuated by the United States and students ideally come to understand the region as a diverse, complex, rich, and fascinating region of study.

LTPO 270: Cultural Studies Through Film

All films watched in this class require a cultural component. Students read and learn about the geographic, historic, social, and political contextual background of each film, plus beliefs, knowledge, rituals, morals, habits, traditions, manners, customs. We discuss these issues and how the film director examines a subject through their films. Students discuss and also compare with the same themes/topics in the US. We examine diversity in the sense of social inequality, internal migration, race, and gender.

MEDH 200:  Introduction to Medical Humanities

The culture of medicine (and of most healthcare) has grown to be white and patriarchal; we question this construction through our unit in philosophy (what do people define as illness?  How do race, culture, and gender determine this?), Culture, Race, Gender, and Sexuality.  We also write illness narratives that are framed around issues of race, SES, culture, or gender, and we write an EHRAF paper asking students to use a cultural anthropology database.

PHIL 206: Topics in Law & Morality: Lesbian, Gay, & Transgender Rights

Examines the gap between cultural aspirations some of us have concerning civil and human rights in two closely intertwined (but distinct) areas—gender identity & sexual identity—and the history and current cultural reality of existing legal institutions and practices in this area.

PSYC 103: Introduction to Psychological Science

How do human beings differ from each other, and from other animals?  Do people from different cultures perceive the world in different ways?  How do different social and cultural groups form?  How do humans develop prejudices against these groups?  What is neurodiversity?  Questions like these are at the heart of psychological science, and each PSYC 103 section will touch on a subset of them.

RELS 101-01: Approaches to Religion: Making Believe and Making Belief in the Study of Religion

This course introduces students to the academic study of religion as a social-cultural phenomenon. Focusing primarily on analytical and methodological approaches drawn from the discipline of Performance Studies, we examine the central importance of embodied practices (rituals, microrituals, habits, comportments) for the development of “religious” consciousness. We examine historical and ethnographic accounts drawn from diverse cultural contexts including: Southeast Asian Buddhism, Euro-American Protestantism, and Haitian Vodou in order to illuminate the various ways that humans make sense of the cosmos.

RELS 105: Introduction to World Religions

is an introduction to the study of religion and of the world’s major religious traditions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Our study will include historical development, sacred text, ritual, and concepts of the divine. Students will, 1) learn a critical approach to the study of religion, 2) gain a general knowledge of each of the world’s major religions, 3) ‘cross over’ to the cultural worldview of others, 4) develop greater empathy and appreciation for these cultures.

RELS 120.01/02: Religion, Art, and Culture

“Religion, Art, and Culture,” which has as its subtitle: “Searching for the Sacred, the Strange, and the Substance of Faith in the South.” This course is cross-listed as SOST 175 “Religions in the US South.” The main theme of “searching for the sacred and the strange” takes us away from mainstream Christianity to explore the religiosity and aesthetic expression of socially marginalized individuals, whose visionary experiences inspire their creation of religious art, music, and food. The course features three different social sites and social groups: white rural Southern Evangelical Christian “outsider” artists; then we move to New Orleans, the birthplace of jazz, where we examine the relationship between African religions, voodoo, jazz funerals, and Mardi Gras Indians; and finally, we return to Charleston to examine the African American Gullah-Geechee tradition of communicating with the dead and African ancestors through visions, dreams, stories, sweetgrass basketry, and spirituals. One of the course goals is to gain appreciation for the diversity of Southern subcultures and peoples, their shared humanity and creativity, especially among eccentric “outsiders”: artists, storytellers, musicians and performers.

SPAN 320Introduction to Textual Analysis

In this course, which is an introduction to literature from Spain and Latin America, students engage with and explore diversity through their study of a variety of literary texts which showcase different cultural norms and practices, linguistic varieties, gender and sexual diversities, as well as raise awareness of issues faced by marginalized communities and disadvantaged groups.

Span 333.01: Topics in Hispanic Cultures: Exploring Iberian Cultures: The Foundations of Spain

Multicultural awareness, religious tolerance, and the ability to see the world through diverse viewpoints are of critical importance for citizens of the 21st century. Spain provides a unique test case for examining these issues due to its regional diversity and the religious pluralism that came about as Christians, Jews, and Muslims coexisted in the Iberian Peninsula for more than seven centuries. How can the legacy of convivencia (or living together) and the cultural hybridity among Iberia’s diverse groups help us understand current discourses in multiculturalism, political fragmentation, and religious tolerance in 21st-century America and Spain? This course will allow you a better understanding of Iberian art, geographical and regional diversity, discourses of inclusion and some of the ways that certain citizens get excluded or marginalized by official discourses.

THTR 310: Theatre History Origins to 1750

covers theatrical history and dramatic literature from theatre’s origins in African storytelling traditions through Age of Enlightenment and its accompanying spread of colonialism during the early seventeenth century. Over 1/3 of the theatre and performance examples are drawn from either works by women or non-European traditions (or both!). Throughout the course, students are encouraged to interrogate the canon and propose alternative historiographical questions through a culminating research project.

THTR 321: Children’s Theatre 

This course opens up the world of theatre written for children onstage and in the audience. The plays and musicals studied include stories from Native American, African American, and Cajun Black Magic culture along with strong female protagonists. We will discuss how these plays reflect the culture of their origin and introduce children to diverse voices. Playwriting, acting, directing, design and technical  theatre is explored throughout the course through practical learning experiences that are ”non-theatre major friendly,” but are still very useful for theatre majors.

WGST200: Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies

Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies engages with issues related to diversity, equity, inclusion and social justice through readings, course activities, and assignments. Students can expect to develop a deeper understanding of how historical and current societies are organized by gender as well as by race, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, social class, (dis)ability and other social categories. Students also will explore how individual identities and experiences are shaped by these categories and the various hierarchies associated with them. As an interdisciplinary course, students can expect to also engage with a diversity of approaches, perspectives, and disciplinary conventions as they explore a wide range of topics.

HONS 226 Honors Colloquium: Foundations of Western Civilization Pre-Modern History

All honors colloquia are required to focus on a central and enduring question.  For this course, that question is: what are the ideas that shaped Western identity in the pre-modern world?  This course-wide theme also envelopes a history specific one.  The vital reason that a knowledge of history is key to all educated voters in a democracy is that people utilize the past:  they use it to describe themselves and people like them as good, and individuals different from them as bad.  The class will provide specific examples of this process.

 

CofC Plan for Fall 2020

By Academic Affairs
Posted on 21 July 2020 | 10:08 pm — 

As the College of Charleston prepares to resume on-campus classes for the fall 2020 semester, the Back on the Bricks website will serve as the official information resource for the university community. Due to the fluid nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, this website will be updated regularly as the College adjusts to evolving conditions and to updated guidance from local, state and federal authorities, which may include Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and others.

The components of this plan, including Housing, AcademicsCampus Life and more, were developed in consultation with students, faculty, staff, deans, chairs, senior administrators, parents, trustees, alumni, health professionals, community members and other stakeholders.

While the College recognizes that this unprecedented worldwide event presents enormous challenges to our academic mission, it also provides incredible opportunities to unite our campus community around common goals and to prepare our students for obstacles they will face in their lives and careers after graduation. One of the defining hallmarks of the liberal arts education the College is known for is adaptability. The broad foundational knowledge that we impart across our curriculum is ideally suited for extraordinary times like these.

Throughout its 250-year history, the College has survived wars, hurricanes, financial calamities and other great challenges. Eventually, we will add the COVID-19 pandemic to the list of challenges we have overcome. And we will do it together, as one family, as Cougars.

Plan Components:

New Call Me MISTER Scholarship Honors Interim Provost Frances Welch

By |May 15, 2020|AcademicsAll News|

Dennis Wright says he never planned on being a teacher. It wasn’t until he was encouraged to enroll in the South Carolina Teacher Cadet program during his senior year of high school that his “eyes were opened” to a career in education.

“I realized that I could have an impact on the kids that need it the most,” says Wright, who is one of eight freshman students recruited to the College by Anthony James, director of the Call Me MISTER (Mentors Instructing Students Toward Effective Role Models) program.

“Many of these young men have never had a minority male teacher, and part of my job is to visit high schools and let them know that teaching is a viable career,” says James.

Call Me MISTER is a state-wide program that was founded at Clemson University in 2000 and brought to the College of Charleston in 2007. Frances Welch, interim provost and executive vice president of academic affairs, worked with Acting Associate Dean of the School of Education, Health, and Human Performance Andrew Lewis and South Carolina Representative and former MISTER Director Floyd Breeland to enroll a half dozen students that first year.

“I was so excited because I knew the statistics about the impact of this program,” recalls Welch, who was the dean of the School of Education, Health, and Human Performance at the time the program launched. “If an African American male in grades PK-8 has at least one African American male teacher, he is three times more likely to complete high school and go to college.”

It’s the importance and wide-reaching impact of the Call Me MISTER program that inspired Steve and Kathy Parks to create a scholarship to support students majoring in teacher education who are participants in the Call Me MISTER program. The Parks’ named the scholarship the Fran Welch Teacher Education Endowed Scholarship in recognition of Welch’s dedication to the field of education and ongoing support of future teachers.

“Our Call Me MISTER program has grown significantly over the years and particularly with the addition of scholarships,” says Welch. “This new scholarship from Steve and Kathy Parks helps fulfill our vision for the MISTER program at the College.”

The Parks have long been supporters of education. Kathy Parks became involved with the College through the Teacher Leader program, which Welch started about 10 years ago.

“Dean Welch has a passion for the teacher education programs as well as exercise science and public health. Steve and I wanted to honor her commitment to the programs as well as her commitment within the greater Charleston area for education including Kids on Point and the Teacher Leader program with a scholarship in her name,” says Kathy Parks. “We chose Call Me MISTER students as the beneficiaries because we both feel strongly that this is an important program for the College and education in South Carolina. Slowly, with scholarships and time, the College is attracting more men of color to join their programs.”

The 2019 Call Me MISTER Signing Day celebration welcomed new students. (Photos by Kip Bulwinkle ’04)

Call Me MISTER provides tuition assistance, an academic support system to help assure student’s success, a cohort system for social and cultural support, and job placement support. James holds weekly group and individual meetings because he says, “being a minority on campus can be a tricky arena to navigate.” Wright says these meetings provide a safe space where he and his fellow classmates can talk about anything. They hold each other accountable, so no man gets left behind.

“Many of these kids are first generation college students, and paying for college is a pretty tall task, especially when you come from a disadvantaged background. Sometimes the students are fearful that they won’t be able to return the next semester because they don’t have the money and it’s heartbreaking,” James says. “This scholarship will remove that hurdle and allow them to focus on the most important thing, which is their academics. It will give them that peace of mind.”

So far, these efforts have worked. Graduates of the MISTER program are teaching in local elementary schools and have received awards and recognition. James encourages the Misters to think broadly about their impact and says, “you’re not great because of what you do, you’re great because of what you help other people do.”

The first recipient of the Fran Welch Teacher Education Endowed Scholarship will be awarded in the fall of 2020. For more information on how to support this scholarship, please contact Lauren Whiteside Mann, senior development officer, at whitesideel@cofc.edu or 843.953.1718.

Congratulations to the 2020 ExCEL Award Recipients

By Academic Affairs
Posted on 15 April 2020 | 8:22 pm — 

Congratulations to the students, staff, faculty and community members who have received the 2020 Excellence in Collegiate Education and Leadership (ExCEL) Awards. Thank you for your commitment to creating a campus environment that promotes diversity and excellence. Read more at http://www.cofc.edu/excelawards/.

Outstanding Students of the Year

School of the Arts – Harlem Farr

School of Business – Kayla Kozak

School of EHHP – Akayla Sellers

School of HSS – Tanner Crunelle

School of LCWA – Isabel Crews

School of Sciences and Mathematics –Olivia Dzieciolowski

Honors College – Cookie Desai

The Graduate School – Delaney Drake

School of Professional Studies – Jeff Ballard

 

Outstanding Faculty of the Year

School of the Arts – Jason White

School of Business – Beatriz Maldonado

School of Education, Health, and Human Performance – Ian O’Byrne

School of Humanities and Social Sciences- Jenn Wilhelm

School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs- Lauren Ravalico

School of Sciences and Mathematics – Narayanan Kuthirummal

Honors College – Brooke Permenter

The Graduate School – Judy Millesen

 

Outstanding Student Awards

Outstanding Female Athlete of the Year – Deja Ford

Outstanding Male Athlete of the Year – Grant Riller

Septima P. Clark Award – Caliyah Parker

Eugene C. Hunt: Graduating Senior – Charlise Page

Eugene C. Hunt: Rising Senior – Reagan Williams

Lucille S. Whipper Award – Vanity Reid Deterville

Stephen C. Osborne and George P. Watt Jr. Bonner

Leader of the Year – Mason Barkley

SCAMP Student of the Year – Jabbarrius Ervin

 

Specialized Awards

Outstanding Staff Member of the Year – Celeste Granger

Administrator of the Year – Marla Robertson

The Unsung Champion – Nora Krasowski

Excellence in Customer Service – Bronwyn Barron

The Safe Zone Advocacy Award – Percival V. Haas

Demetria Clemmons Distinguished Mentoring Award – Page Keller

The Good Neighbor Award – Stephen Skardon, Jr.

Eddie Ganaway Distinguished Alumni Award – Tanya T. Harper

Leo I. Higdon Presidential Award – Jesse “Tripp” Keeffe

Harry M. Lightsey, Jr. Presidential Award – Carlin Nelson

 

Sustainability Awards

Student Sustainability Award – Sofia Troya Zambrano

Distinguished Faculty Sustainability Award – Todd LeVasseur

From the Office of Summer School

Faculty, Chairs and Program Directors: If a faculty member is scheduled to teach a lecture course in Maymester or any of the summer terms this year and  plans to deliver the course 100% synchronously, the course schedule type must be listed as “Online Study + Scheduled Online Meetings” with the approved Maymester or summer term meeting times for face-to-face sections. Otherwise, students can have course conflicts when they enroll in more than one course per term or in overlapping terms. If the course will be delivered 100% asynchronously, then the course schedule type must be listed as “Online Exclusively”. If the faculty member plans to offer your course mostly asynchronously but with some synchronous meetings, again the schedule type must be listed as “Online Study + Scheduled Online Meetings” but list the specific days and times of day for those synchronous meetings on the schedule too. All lecture sections will be delivered online this summer, and these three designations are the most user friendly for our students.

Additionally, faculty must take the self-paced express DE readiness course this month to teach a lecture section this summer unless they have already completed the usual six-week DE readiness course. Mr. Phillips expects the self-paced DE readiness course to be available starting next week, and our deputy CIO Zach Hartje will contact faculty who have not yet completed the usual DE readiness course and are scheduled to teach a lecture section this summer. Thank you in advance for your patience and understanding as we prepare for this summer.

Contact: Michael Phillips, Director, Summer School, 843.953.4942, phillipsm@cofc.edu

Suzanne Austin Named CofC’s Next Provost

By Academic Affairs
Posted on 1 April 2020 | 8:45 pm — 

Suzanne Austin

President Andrew T. Hsu announced Wednesday, April 1, 2020, the appointment of Suzanne Austin as the College of Charleston’s next provost and executive vice president for academic affairs.

Austin will succeed Interim Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Frances C. Welch, who took on the role in May of 2019. Austin will begin at CofC on July 1, 2020.

With a career spanning nearly three decades in academia, Austin, who holds a doctorate in history from Duke University, has spent the last nine years serving as the senior vice provost and senior international officer at the University of Alabama at Birmingham where she has led a series of initiatives focused on student success, faculty development, international programs and online learning.

“Suzanne Austin is an incredible addition to the College of Charleston’s leadership team. She possesses both a strong academic pedigree and a tremendous track record of success throughout her career,” Hsu said in a message to the campus community. “These attributes, combined with her laser focus on student success, faculty success and her experience in implementing and executing strategic plans, make her a great fit for our university.”

For Austin, the College’s forward momentum under Hsu along with the pending launch of the institution’s new strategic plan are what appealed to her most about joining CofC.

“I’m really excited about the opportunity to work with all of the students, faculty and staff at the College of Charleston,” says Austin. “I’ve known about the College for a long time and have visited the campus several times over the years. I know what an excellent academic institution the College is, and the opportunity to serve the institution is very exciting to me.”

The College’s search for a new provost was led by Alicia Caudill, executive vice president for student affairs, and Simon Lewis, English professor and speaker of the Faculty Senate. R. William Funk & Associates assisted in the search. Members of the College’s search committee included faculty, deans and administrators from across campus.

Since joining the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) in 2011, Austin has spearheaded initiatives to improve retention and graduation of students, established UAB’s first-ever Undergraduate Academic Success Center, redesigned and expanded the UAB Honors College, created the Office of Student Engagement to focus on at-risk students, developed and launched the Office of Global Engagement and expanded the Division of eLearning and Professional Studies, among many other successful academic efforts.

Austin hopes to help shepherd similar endeavors at CofC. During her visit to campus in March, Austin spoke with deans, chairs and faculty about opportunities for faculty development as well as possibilities related to new academic programs at the College.

“It’s clear there are many exciting initiatives already underway and these will continue to move forward over the summer and into the fall,” Austin says.

Prior to joining UAB, Austin spent 20 years at the University of Delaware serving in a variety of academic positions including as associate provost for academic affairs and faculty director for the Office of the Vice Provost for Research and Graduate Studies.

Growing up in Madison, Connecticut, Austin, from a young age, had an interest in learning about new places and people, a curiosity which ultimately drove her to study English and journalism as an undergraduate student at North Carolina State University before pursuing a graduate degree in history from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

As she followed her career into academia, Austin became fascinated by the rich history and culture of Latin America – which led her on many international adventures.

“Since I am a historian of Latin America, I love traveling in that part of the world,” says Austin. “I have lived in Mexico and Ecuador, but I love traveling everywhere.”

And her passion for understanding how the past intersects with the present made moving to Charleston, a location steeped in history, all the more attractive.

“I love traveling and exploring new places, and I am very excited about exploring the Charleston area,” she says.

As a historian of colonial Latin America, Austin has focused her research on the demography and epidemiology of the Andean region. Her 2003 book, A Pest in the Land: New World Epidemics in a Global Perspective, studies disease among the native peoples of the New World before and after 1492 – a topic which has relevant parallels to current global events.

Nearly two decades after publishing A Pest in the Land, Austin says the impact of disease 400 years ago and what we are experiencing now with the coronavirus pandemic bears some striking similarities.

“The similarities around what happens to social networks and the delivery of social services during times of epidemic or pandemic disease are remarkable,” she says. “The source of stresses COVID-19 puts on individuals and on communities is similar in many ways to what occurred throughout Spain’s American colonies during the 16th and 17th centuries.”

But the ongoing disruptions around the world – and the related impacts on institutions of higher education like the College – are challenges that Austin is not afraid to tackle as she prepares to help CofC move forward.

“I think we’ll all come through this stronger – we may be different in some ways, but I think we’ll be stronger as institutions and as a nation,” she says.

Source: https://today.cofc.edu/2020/04/01/suzanne-austin-named-college-of-charleston-provost/

Grading Policy for Spring 2020

Full Term or Express II Undergraduate and Graduate Courses

 College of Charleston | March 29, 2020
  • A notation will appear on undergraduate and graduate official transcripts indicating a significant disruption during the Spring 2020 semester
  • The deadline for students to withdraw from one or more full term or Express II courses will be extended. Students may withdraw from April 7, 2020 through April 22, 2020.
  • Faculty will use standard letter grades to submit students’ final course grades by May 1, 2020, by 5 p.m. This change in deadline is necessary to implement the new pass-fail grade type. Submission of all grades by this deadline is critically important.
  • A new pass-fall grade-type has been created for this semester. Students will be able to choose between the standard grade type (A-F) or the new pass-fall grade type (PS/NS) for each course completed in Express II or full-semester Spring 2020.
  • Undergraduate (PS/NS): If the pass-fail grade type is selected, a PS will replace standard grades A through D-. A NS will replace standard grades F and WA.*
  • Graduate (PS/NS): If the pass-fail grade type is selected, a PS will replace standard grades A-C. A NS will replace the standard grade F.

 Students will receive additional instructions about how to select the grade type for each course completed in Spring 2020. There will be a 48-hour period after final grades are visible to students in which students will make their selection for each course.  

  • In making the decision to retain standard grades or choose the new pass-fail grade type, students should talk with their faculty, advisors, and family. There are several factors to consider:
  • Students may choose the PS/NS option for one, some, or all their
  • A PS grade will earn credit hours but will not count in GPA calculations.
  • A NS grade will earn zero credit hours and will not count in GPA calculations.
  • Courses graded PS will fulfill major, minor, certificate, general education, and degree requirements.
  • The pass-fail grade type is only available for completed courses. An Incomplete (I) is not eligible for the PS/NS grade.
  • The pass-fail grade type is not available for audit, repeat, and courses designated P/NP (pass/no pass). EDLS 100 is not eligible for the pass-fail grade type.
  • Criteria for Dean’s List, President’s List, and Latin Honors remain unchanged; that is, only course credit earned at the College and graded with standard letter grades may be used to qualify.
  • This grading policy is in place for the 2020 Spring Semester.

*For South Carolina state scholarships (Palmetto Fellows, LIFE or SC HOPE), credit hours for the ”PS” grade do count towards scholarship eligibility, but not the GPA criterion since the GPA is not impacted by the “PS” grade. 

Please visit https://registrar.cofc.edu/grades for more information. 

 

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