Author Archives: Tom Kunkle

CofC Math Short Film Fest TONIGHT

Like math? Like film/TV? Like Pizza? If you answered yes to any of those questions, then come join us for the CofC Mathematical Short Film Festival on Friday, Feb. 10th from 6 to 8pm. The event is hosted by the Department of Mathematics and will take place in RSS 235. Quality pizza and refreshments will be provided.

We will feature a variety of shorts, including episodes of The Simpsons, Futurama, Recess, and the Twilight Zone, as well as “The Secret Number” and “What are the Odds?”

Click Bender to witness his excitement for the film fest.   Still not convinced?   Then see the poster.   (Warning: contains cool images that compel the viewer to attend this event.)

 

Harrison Randolph Calculus Contest on 4/14/2016 to award $100.00.

The Harrison Randolph calculus exam is a written test of challenging problems using material covered in Math 120. The student who performs the best will be given the Harrison Randolph Calculus Award at the Honor Ceremony in May and  receive a check for $100.

Any student who took Math 120 in Summer 2015, Fall 2015, or Spring 2016 is eligible to compete.  All freshmen & transfer students are eligible, even if they placed out of 120.

The test will be Thursday April 14, 2016, 3:00-5:00 pm RSS Room 353 (Conference Rm).

If you’re interested in taking the exam, please contact Garrett Mitchener (MitchenerG@cofc.edu).

Correction:  An earlier post incorrectly listed first prize as $100!.  Our apologizes for any confusion this may have caused.

 

One last MESS with Professor Ivey, Wed., April 13, 2016.

Professor Tom Ivey finishes this semester’s MESS (Mathematical Explorations Seminar Series) of colloquium talks for undergraduate math majors with “The geometry of differential equations” at 3:10pm Wed. April 13, 2016, in 104 RSS.  Professor Ivey studies problems that lie at the interface between differential equations and geometry and is an expert in differential geometry and paVortexPortraitrtial differential equations, especially evolution equations, integrable systems, and exterior differential systems.  Differential equations are the most commonly used tool in applied mathematics and this talk is sure to be of interest to many students and faculty alike.

For more information, see the flyer.

The talk is preceded by tea in the math department lounge 346 RSS at 2:45pm. 

Mitchener’s MESS scheduled for Wed., April 6, 2016.

This semester’s MESS (Mathematical Explorations Seminar Series) of colloquium talks for undergraduate math majors continues at 3:10pm Wed. April 6, 2016, in 104 RSS with “Using artificial life simulations to test hypotheses about evolutionary dynamics,” by Professor Garrett Mitchener.  Professor Mitchener is an imaginative researcher whose many interests include modeling the forces at work in natural selection and how they play into the evolution of communication.21W

For more information, see the flyer.

The talk is preceded by tea in the math department lounge 346 RSS at 2:45pm. 

Kasman’s MESS scheduled for Wed. Mar 2, 2016.

Professor Alex Kasman continues this semester’s series of colloquium talks for undergraduate math majors at 3:10pm Wed. Mar 2, 2016, in 104 RSS with an introduction to the fascinating subject of solitons.   These seemingly impossible wave forms have had a huge impact in not just physics and applied mathematics but also the real world.  Profess Kasman is a soliton expert and terrific teacher.  This talk is not to be missed!MESS2016KasmanImage

For more information, see the flyer, and Professor Kaman’s Soliton Page.

The talk is preceded by tea in the math department lounge 346 RSS at 2:45pm.   Come by and say hi.

First MESS of the semester scheduled for Wed. Feb 17, 2016.

ccopairsProfessor Elizabeth Jurisich kicks off this semester’s series of colloquium talks for undergraduate math majors at 3:10pm Wed. Feb 17, 2016, in 104 RSS with an introduction to the problem she worked on during her recent sabbatical.   These talks are a great way to learn some new mathematics and to see firsthand what various members of our department do in their own research.

The talk is preceded by tea in the math department lounge 346 RSS at 2:45pm.   Come by and say hi.  For an abstract and more information, see the flyer.