Exciting events in Hispanic Studies

Check out some of the exciting things that have been happening in Hispanic Studies!

Global Foodways in Skirt Magazine

Professor Lauren Ravalico, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of French and Francophone Studies and a member of the executive committee for Women’s and Gender Studies at the College of Charleston. In this article she discusses her research and passion for the Global Foodways program.

“This stew of intellectual interest and personal connection to the kitchen has simmered for a long time and ultimately inspired me to attempt coordinating a yearlong program of courses and events at the College of Charleston called “Global Foodways.” Besides having the opportunity to teach my own “Culture of the French Table” course as part of the program, it has been amazing to see the range of disciplines in which food takes the spotlight. Students can learn about the history of tea in China, the sociology of food, food culture and sustainability in Italy, food as medicine, and dozens of other options.”

“It is my hope that Global Foodways will serve as a virtual table around which members of the academic community and beyond can engage in conversations and sensory experiences that open our hearts and minds.”

Check out the full article here!

https://www.skirt.com/global-foodways/ 

 

 

Global Foodways in The College Today!

Erin Perkins of The College Today sat down with professor Lauren Ravalico who created the Global Foodways program as the 2018-2019 World Affairs Signature Series. They discussed the how the program will be a year of courses and events for understanding the global meanings of food featuring courses in anthropology, biology, Chinese, environmental and sustainability studies, exercise science, French, health, history, Italian, religion, sociology, Southern studies, Spanish, Russian, and women’s and gender studies.

Exciting events, including tastings, cooking demonstrations, lectures and discussions, film screenings, and theatrical performances will bridge the local and the international to focus on: Community of the Table | Sustainable Eating Practices | Historical and Political Perspectives on Food

You can check out the full article here: http://today.cofc.edu/2018/10/19/global-foodways-program/ 

LCWA World Affairs Colloquium Series: Creating a Start-Up Region in Israel-Palestine

On October 28th at 10am in Arnold Hall Yadin Kaufmann will be presenting the lecture “Creating a Start-Up Region in Israel-Palestine.”

Stagnant economic growth, high unemployment, and a sharp decline in donor aid to Palestine create a volatile mix that breeds instability in the region. This situation is bad for Palestinians and dangerous for Israel. A bright spot in the otherwise grim Palestinian economic horizon is the technology ecosystem that has begun to develop in recent years. The technology sector, which already accounts for some 6% of Palestinian GDP, can be the engine to drive economic growth in Palestine, as it has been in neighboring Israel, with similar positive impacts. This is important both for Palestine and for Israel – irrespective of political developments.

Yadin Kaufmann has been involved in early-stage venture capital investments in Israel since 1987, through Athena, the first Israel-focused venture fund, and Veritas Venture Partners, which he co-founded in 1990. In 2011, Yadin co-founded Sadara Ventures, the first fund targeting investments in Palestinian technology companies. Most recently, Yadin founded and is Chairman of the Palestinian Internship Program, a non-profit organization that brings recent Palestinian university graduates for three-month internships at tech and finance companies in Israel. Yadin received his B.A. from Princeton, M.A. from Harvard, and J.D. from Harvard Law School, where he was an editor of the Law Review. Foreign Policy named Yadin to the list of 100 “Leading Global Thinkers” in 2017. Yadin lives in Israel, but is a Charlestonian by marriage: his wife Lori Banov Kaufmann is the daughter of Dr. Charles and Nancy Banov.

Co-sponsored by Academic Affairs and the School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs

FALL MINI-SEMINARS IN JEWISH STUDIES

Learning is what goes on in colleges and Jewish Studies is at its heart a vibrant academic program, with community outreach a prominent feature of its identity, from the Program’s inception more than thirty years ago. This semester Jewish Studies will re-introduce serious mini-seminars, essentially condensed courses (or highlights of courses) consisting of class sessions devoted to a single topic. Mini-seminars are free and open to the public. Enrollees are expected to secure the required reading, complete all assignments, and to attend all of the class sessions, thereby creating a genuine learning community. The class discussions will assume that enrollees have done the required assignments. The reading assignments will be made available on-line prior to the first class meeting.

Contact Mark Swick for details at swickmn@cofc.edu or 843-953-4930.

This fall, Jewish Studies will offer three mini-seminars; (1) a weekly immersive ulpan class by Professor Noa Weinberg which introduces students to Hebrew, both as a spoken language and as a written one; (2) a three-session exploration by Rabbi Moshe Davis of contemporary issues which help define Modern Orthodoxy; and (3) a three-session “highlights” of Professor Joshua Shanes’ course on Jewish Mysticism.

2014 African American Studies Study Abroad Program Barbados – University of West Indies: Cavehill

The African American Studies Study Abroad Program began in 2012 with Roneka Matheny. During the Maymester, she took a group of students to the island of Barbados. The following academic year, I was asked to continue the program. Instead of organizing a subsequent trip in the summer of 2013, with the assistance of Mary Battle, I had the pleasure of taking a planning trip to Barbados. Prior to my travels, Mary Battle connected me with Rhoda Green, the Honorary Barbados Consul to South Carolina who resides in Charleston, SC.  She provided me with significant information on the history of the connectedness between Charleston and Barbados, along with providing me the names of several individuals to contact and plan to meet while in Barbados. As I embarked to Barbados, I had the privilege of meeting with several stakeholders who were vested in seeing the program continue as it did in 2012. I met with Janet Caroo, Marketing Officer and Regional Student Development at UWI-Cavehill, and Kevin Farmer, Deputy Director of the Barbados Museum & Historical Society. This planning session provided us the opportunity to work out details for the study abroad trip (e.g., costs; classroom space; dorm space; tours, etc.). Upon my return to Charleston, Dr. Conseula Francis and I created a planning committee that included the relaunching of the trip for the summer of 2014. During the 2013-2014 academic year, we actively promoted the trip through the Center for International Education, along with emails to the African American Studies minors as well as other students enrolled in our classes.

We billed the program as a bridge to Rhoda Green’s Carolina-Barbados Foundation, by highlighting the social, economic, political, and cultural link between Charleston and Barbados.  Barbados has a unique cultural history with the low country. From the plantation life to architecture, there are relics of historic Charleston that owes its existence to Barbados.

Our recruitment efforts resulted in securing ten CofC students for the three-week study abroad trip. The program was organized into two sections. The first week students remained in Charleston, SC exploring the local history of Charleston, and its link to Barbados, by visiting Charlestowne Landing and Magnolia Plantation. Students also had an opportunity to meet with Mrs. Rhoda Green, who provided an in-depth history of the Carolinas-Barbados connection. The remaining two weeks were spent in Barbados where students took 6-credit hours (Comparative Black Identity; Blackface in the Global Imaginary); participated in several island tours exploring the local history (e.g., Barbados Museum of History; Mount Gay Rum Tours; St. Nicholas Abbey; Speighstown; walking tour of historic Bridgetown). Additionally, students were also able to explore the island as a group, void of professor oversight. During this time, students were able to shop, meet and interact with the locals, and connect classroom course information with the physical, tangible world of Barbados.

As an assignment, students were required to make daily posts on a created blog to chronicle their group outings and adventures. The videos below are examples of our experiences on the beautiful island of Barbados.

In the upcoming academic year, Roneka Matheny plans to relaunch the AAST Study Abroad program. She plans to create a broader, more comprehensive program where students would spend two weeks in Charleston, again exploring the cultural and historical links to the Caribbean; two weeks in Barbados; and two weeks in Jamaica. Although course proposals are in the preliminary stages, the two purported courses would focus on the use of music as a form of social protest (e.g., Bob Marley) and on the shared Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade History.

Dr. Anthony D. Greene

 

A WORLD OF JEWISH CULTURE AT PICCOLO SPOLETO

A World of Jewish Culture began twenty years ago in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the State of Israel.

Now celebrating Israel @ 70, the Jewish Studies program is thrilled to present three Israeli films in their Charleston debut. Screenings will be held in Arnold Hall. Admission is $10, with popcorn and refreshments provided.

6/3 at 10AM: Israel at 70 Film Series: Ben Gurion, Epilogue
6/5 at 6PM: Israel at 70 Film Series: Israel – A Home Movie
6/6 at 6PM: Israel at 70 Film Series: The Fifth Heaven

Also taking place back by popular demand, music leaders from Congregation Bet Haverim in Atlanta bring their vibrant voice and spirit to Saffron’s Jewish Coffeehouse for an encore performance. Will RobertsonGayanne Geurin, Brad Davidorf, and Sarah Zaslaw – singers accompanied by violin, accordion, and guitar – travel the spectrum of eras and places, languages, and moods, honoring facets of the Jewish experience.

To check out the full list of events click the link
AWOJC 2018 PRESS RELEASE.

Buy tickets to the events HERE.

10th Annual World Cultures Fair

On Thursday, March 29th the School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs hosted the 10th Annual World Cultures Fair. People got to enjoy great food, music, live performances, and learn about a variety of other cultures. Here are just some of the photos taken at the event. You can find many more at the CofC World Cultures Fair Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=oa.1593702730708166&type=3

Nicole Guidotti-Hernández to Deliver a Lecture on Latinx Identity

In conjunction with Professor Crabtree’s LCWA Junior Faculty Colloquium, Nicole Guidotti-Hernández will deliver a public lecture titled “Latinx: The Future is Now” on April 6 at 2:00 pm in Addlestone 227. This lecture charts out the histories of how we went from using Mexican American and Puerto Rican to Chicano and Nuyorican and then to the latest iterations, Latina/o and now Latinx. By drawing on specific bodies of evidence both in the creation of new-phase ethnic studies departments in the 2000s and public digital discourse, I demonstrate that while millennials are leading the charge with the Latinx conversation, their boomer intellectual forerunners not are ready for and are often outright resistant to the use of Latina/o let alone Latinx, indicating the futurist potential and political necessity of the term. In making a historical argument about terminology linked to the fields of Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies, I show the work of hegemonic logic in how majority minority populations shape discourse with their mere numbers and their access to discourse: print, digital, and aural. To be a part of the affective community is antiessentialist because Latinx bears the load of recognition and diversity and represents the power of inclusion without speaking for everyone. Ultimately, people invest in Latinx because it carries the excessive and diverse affective load of a population in ways that other ethno-nationalist and pan-Latina/o terms cannot.

This lecture is free and open to the public.