A WORLD OF JEWISH CULTURE AT PICCOLO SPOLETO

A World of Jewish Culture began twenty years ago in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the State of Israel.

Now celebrating Israel @ 70, the Jewish Studies program is thrilled to present three Israeli films in their Charleston debut. Screenings will be held in Arnold Hall. Admission is $10, with popcorn and refreshments provided.

6/3 at 10AM: Israel at 70 Film Series: Ben Gurion, Epilogue
6/5 at 6PM: Israel at 70 Film Series: Israel – A Home Movie
6/6 at 6PM: Israel at 70 Film Series: The Fifth Heaven

Also taking place back by popular demand, music leaders from Congregation Bet Haverim in Atlanta bring their vibrant voice and spirit to Saffron’s Jewish Coffeehouse for an encore performance. Will RobertsonGayanne Geurin, Brad Davidorf, and Sarah Zaslaw – singers accompanied by violin, accordion, and guitar – travel the spectrum of eras and places, languages, and moods, honoring facets of the Jewish experience.

To check out the full list of events click the link
AWOJC 2018 PRESS RELEASE.

Buy tickets to the events HERE.

10th Annual World Cultures Fair

On Thursday, March 29th the School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs hosted the 10th Annual World Cultures Fair. People got to enjoy great food, music, live performances, and learn about a variety of other cultures. Here are just some of the photos taken at the event. You can find many more at the CofC World Cultures Fair Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=oa.1593702730708166&type=3

World Cultures Fair 2017

Despite the gray skies the 9th Annual World Cultures Fair was held on March 30, 2017. While the rain did come down and the event was cut short there was a great turn out! The fair’s aim is to bring various cultures and traditions from around the world to the Charleston community. The event showcased international cultures with over 30 tables displaying crafts, foods and information about student clubs and international programs at the College. Attendees were entertained by student, faculty, and community musicians and performers.

 

 

 

 

After 15 Years, Cuba Study Abroad Program is as Vital as Ever

After 15 Years, Cuba Study Abroad Program is as Vital as Ever

When the College of Charleston launched its study abroad program in Havana, Cuba in summer 2000, travel and relations between the U.S. and Cuba were already difficult. Maintaining the program, which sends about 12 students to Havana each spring, has been challenging and often unpredictable, but it has always been rewarding.

cuba study abroad

Students studying abroad in Havana. Photo by Britton Holmes.

“My time in Cuba impacted me in more ways than I can count,” said Britton Holmes, a junior international studies and political science double major who studied abroad in Havana during the spring 2014 semester. “The culture is so rich, whether it’s the music, the art, the dance, etc. The people love being Cuban. They’re proud of their culture and they want to share it with everyone.”

 RELATED:Learn more about the College’s study abroad program in Cuba

The program that Holmes speaks of, though, is vastly different than the program the first 100 students to study in Havana experienced. In 2000, when International Studies Department Chair Douglas Friedman and Professor Emeritus of Hispanic Studies Jose Escobar launched the program with 20 students, participants spent four weeks and lived in what was essentially a hotel. When the embargo in Cuba was tightened in 2004, it required that those visiting with an education license must spend a minimum of 10 weeks. That was when the program went from a summer study-abroad experience to a full semester.

Photo taken in Cuba by Douglas Friedman

Photo taken in Cuba by Douglas Friedman

These restrictions caused many universities to end their own programs in Cuba, but the College’s commitment to sharing the educational and cultural opportunities in Cuba kept the program alive. “In 2004 there were more than 100 universities with programs in Cuba,” Friedman said. “In 2005 there were three.”

RELATED: Check out the department of international studies

2007 marked the first spring semester in Havana – after attempting a hurricane-filled fall semester in 2005 – and the program has remained in the spring since. Students now live in apartments on the outskirts of Havana, allowing them easy access to the city without the round-the-clock distractions of Havana in such close proximity. It also makes students clean up and cook for themselves, providing them a more immersive experience.

“We’ve progressively tried to make the experience more genuine,” Friedman said. “Now we’re able to rent apartments for short-term use, and students have full kitchens – they’re actually living there. They have to deal with the same food shortages that Cubans deal with, they have to learn the different currencies, and they have to learn to navigate Havana. It’s a much more immersive experience.”

Holmes, who lived in the apartments, is a testament to this. “There is not a better place I could think of to get a full experience of pure Latin American culture,” she said. “I feel like a gained a Cuban family as well as a College of Charleston family.”

Holmes’ account of her time in Havana reflects the many unique opportunities provided through the program – not only is the Cuba program very small, allowing for students to form a tight-knit community, but also living in an embargoed country for 11 weeks is something that few Americans can experience.

cuba study abroad

Photo taken in Cuba by Britton Holmes

This is unlike any of the other programs we have,” Associate Provost for International Education Andrew Sobiesuo said. “In terms of the experience, the facilities and the adjustment that students have to make. They really learn to appreciate the advantages they have as Americans when they see what Cubans go through on a daily basis. It makes their experience much richer.”

Becoming immersed in the Cuban lifestyle can be jarring for some students. Holmes described ideal participants as “adventurous people who like to experience new cultures.” She went on to say that people interested in political science and/or Latin American history, culture and society as well as those interested in vintage cars, architecture, dancing and nightlife would also enjoy the program.

The next round of students considering studying abroad in Havana have a few months to apply – the deadline is December 1, 2014 – and in the meantime Friedman and Sobiesuo are working to get the program director in Cuba, Humberto Miranda, to Charleston in November for a 15th anniversary celebration and to teach his usual express II courses, Social Movements in Comparative Perspective and Cuban Politics and Society.

During his annual visits to Charleston, Miranda helps recruit students for the program both by providing information on the fascinating classes taught by his fellow University of Havana and Instituto de Filosofia faculty members and telling students about the unique and storied culture that awaits them in Cuba.

For Holmes, the description of daily life and friendly locals in Cuba was the selling point. “Their culture is super inclusive… I feel really lucky to have been able to experience it.”

Alliance Fracaise Cine-Club: “2 Automnes, 3 Hivers”

Date: Friday, April 11, 2014
Time: 7-9pm
Location: MUSC Basic Science Building, Room 100, 173 Ashley Avenue

Admission:  $3.00 for members and students under 25, $5.00 for general public.
WEBSITE:  http://a-f-Charleston.com

This will be our last Ciné-Club film presentation until September!

This Friday evening we will see a 2013 Cannes Film Festival Selection, 2 AUTOMNES, 3 HIVERS (2 Autumns, 3 Winters) 2013, written and directed by up-and-coming Sébastien Betbeder.

Sébastien Betbeder was born in 1975 in Pau in the South West of France and attended the prestigious Ecole des Beaux Arts in Bordeaux.  He has been making shorts since 1999, this is his second feature, Nights With Theodore (2012) which won the FIPRESCI (International Federation of Film Critics) Award at the San Francisco Film Festival, was his first.

Sébastien Betbeder is part of this new generation of French filmmakers recognized by Les Cahiers du Cinéma who think French cinema has become very academic, using conventional structures and very very expensive. They felt it was time to invent.

Betbeder chose 21st century 30-something characters because he felt people love differently in 2013, they think differently about death, they are less and less neglectful and careless, they worry more. He thinks that in the contemporary world there is a pre-disposition to accidents and he wanted to show characters with the optimism of youth but facing difficult situations.
With a light budget of $400,000 he filmed over one year from Bordeaux to the Auvergne region and Paris.