LCWA Advisory Board Member Adam Chubb on Exercise Science in Germany and his decade as a professional basketball player in the German Bundesliga

BERLIN – MARCH 25: Adam Chubb of Berlin in action during the Basketball Bundesliga match between Alba Berlin and Ratiopharm Ulm at the O2 World Arena on March 25, 2009 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Matthias Kern/Bongarts/Getty Images)



Thinking about what foreign language to combine with your Exercise Science or Athletic Training major? Former professional basketball player Adam Chub advises students to consider German! A member of the advisory board of CofC’s school of Languages, Cultures and World Affairs, Adam spent a decade playing in the German Bundesliga, for teams such as Alba Berlin, Gießen 46ers, and Eisbären Bremerhaven. During his career in Europe, he learned first hand why Germany is a world leader in the fields of exercise science and sports medicine. Read more about his experience and his role in CofC’s School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs in this Q&A.

Q: What led you to play professional basketball in Germany and what was it like to play there for a decade?

A. I accepted a job in Germany my second year out playing professional basketball. I originally went to Germany because I was offered a job, but stayed for 10 years because I loved the country, its people and culture. They had a great sports culture and basketball was an up and coming sport due to Dirk Nowitzki catching on fast in the NBA. The culture and atmosphere was similar to the United States so that helped me feel comfortable no matter what region of the country I played and lived in some small farm towns as well as big cities like Berlin. I was able to get a feel for the country and its people over my 10 years there.

Q: During your long career in Germany, you worked with a wide range of professionals in sports medicine, physiotherapy, and athletic training. How and why does Germany excel so much in these fields?

A. The German Sport University in a renowned university in Köln that was founded in 1947. With 6000 students, the university produces some of the top sports medicine professionals in the world. Germany also has a strong soccer culture and high-performing clubs that demand top doctors, trainers and physiotherapists to keep their athletes healthy. Even American athletes like Kobe Bryant and Alex Rodriguez have traveled to Germany to see German doctors and get treatment they can’t receive anywhere else in the world.

Q. You didn’t speak German before you made the move, but learned German on the ground and on the court. Why should students interested in careers in sports-related fields learn German?

A. Since Germany is known for its sports medicine, learning German would be beneficial to anyone interested in a sports-related field. With the globalization of sports and business today, speaking German would created great opportunities in the United States as well as overseas. It would give you top-level access to sports and medicine-related fields as well as education.

Q. After you ended your career, you moved to Charleston and recently joined the Advisory Board of CofC’s School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs. Why did you get involved with LCWA at the College and what do you hope to accomplish on the board?

A. I am hoping to be a resource for advice and guidance to the school and students through my international, cultural and business experiences in Europe. Being able help others reach their international business and education goals by sharing my experiences and connections is my ultimate goal.

LCWA Advisory Board Member Adam Chubb on Exercise Science in Germany and his decade as a professional basketball player in the German Bundesliga

BERLIN – MARCH 25: Adam Chubb of Berlin in action during the Basketball Bundesliga match between Alba Berlin and Ratiopharm Ulm at the O2 World Arena on March 25, 2009 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Matthias Kern/Bongarts/Getty Images)



Thinking about what foreign language to combine with your Exercise Science or Athletic Training major? Former professional basketball player Adam Chub advises students to consider German! A member of the advisory board of CofC’s school of Languages, Cultures and World Affairs, Adam spent a decade playing in the German Bundesliga, for teams such as Alba Berlin, Gießen 46ers, and Eisbären Bremerhaven. During his career in Europe, he learned first hand why Germany is a world leader in the fields of exercise science and sports medicine. Read more about his experience and his role in CofC’s School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs in this Q&A.

Q: What led you to play professional basketball in Germany and what was it like to play there for a decade?

A. I accepted a job in Germany my second year out playing professional basketball. I originally went to Germany because I was offered a job, but stayed for 10 years because I loved the country, its people and culture. They had a great sports culture and basketball was an up and coming sport due to Dirk Nowitzki catching on fast in the NBA. The culture and atmosphere was similar to the United States so that helped me feel comfortable no matter what region of the country I played and lived in some small farm towns as well as big cities like Berlin. I was able to get a feel for the country and its people over my 10 years there.

Q: During your long career in Germany, you worked with a wide range of professionals in sports medicine, physiotherapy, and athletic training. How and why does Germany excel so much in these fields?

A. The German Sport University in a renowned university in Köln that was founded in 1947. With 6000 students, the university produces some of the top sports medicine professionals in the world. Germany also has a strong soccer culture and high-performing clubs that demand top doctors, trainers and physiotherapists to keep their athletes healthy. Even American athletes like Kobe Bryant and Alex Rodriguez have traveled to Germany to see German doctors and get treatment they can’t receive anywhere else in the world.

Q. You didn’t speak German before you made the move, but learned German on the ground and on the court. Why should students interested in careers in sports-related fields learn German?

A. Since Germany is known for its sports medicine, learning German would be beneficial to anyone interested in a sports-related field. With the globalization of sports and business today, speaking German would created great opportunities in the United States as well as overseas. It would give you top-level access to sports and medicine-related fields as well as education.

Q. After you ended your career, you moved to Charleston and recently joined the Advisory Board of CofC’s School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs. Why did you get involved with LCWA at the College and what do you hope to accomplish on the board?

A. I am hoping to be a resource for advice and guidance to the school and students through my international, cultural and business experiences in Europe. Being able help others reach their international business and education goals by sharing my experiences and connections is my ultimate goal.

LCWA Advisory Board Member Adam Chubb on Exercise Science in Germany and his decade as a professional basketball player in the German Bundesliga

BERLIN – MARCH 25: Adam Chubb of Berlin in action during the Basketball Bundesliga match between Alba Berlin and Ratiopharm Ulm at the O2 World Arena on March 25, 2009 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Matthias Kern/Bongarts/Getty Images)



Thinking about what foreign language to combine with your Exercise Science or Athletic Training major? Former professional basketball player Adam Chub advises students to consider German! A member of the advisory board of CofC’s school of Languages, Cultures and World Affairs, Adam spent a decade playing in the German Bundesliga, for teams such as Alba Berlin, Gießen 46ers, and Eisbären Bremerhaven. During his career in Europe, he learned first hand why Germany is a world leader in the fields of exercise science and sports medicine. Read more about his experience and his role in CofC’s School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs in this Q&A.

Q: What led you to play professional basketball in Germany and what was it like to play there for a decade?

A. I accepted a job in Germany my second year out playing professional basketball. I originally went to Germany because I was offered a job, but stayed for 10 years because I loved the country, its people and culture. They had a great sports culture and basketball was an up and coming sport due to Dirk Nowitzki catching on fast in the NBA. The culture and atmosphere was similar to the United States so that helped me feel comfortable no matter what region of the country I played and lived in some small farm towns as well as big cities like Berlin. I was able to get a feel for the country and its people over my 10 years there.

Q: During your long career in Germany, you worked with a wide range of professionals in sports medicine, physiotherapy, and athletic training. How and why does Germany excel so much in these fields?

A. The German Sport University in a renowned university in Köln that was founded in 1947. With 6000 students, the university produces some of the top sports medicine professionals in the world. Germany also has a strong soccer culture and high-performing clubs that demand top doctors, trainers and physiotherapists to keep their athletes healthy. Even American athletes like Kobe Bryant and Alex Rodriguez have traveled to Germany to see German doctors and get treatment they can’t receive anywhere else in the world.

Q. You didn’t speak German before you made the move, but learned German on the ground and on the court. Why should students interested in careers in sports-related fields learn German?

A. Since Germany is known for its sports medicine, learning German would be beneficial to anyone interested in a sports-related field. With the globalization of sports and business today, speaking German would created great opportunities in the United States as well as overseas. It would give you top-level access to sports and medicine-related fields as well as education.

Q. After you ended your career, you moved to Charleston and recently joined the Advisory Board of CofC’s School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs. Why did you get involved with LCWA at the College and what do you hope to accomplish on the board?

A. I am hoping to be a resource for advice and guidance to the school and students through my international, cultural and business experiences in Europe. Being able help others reach their international business and education goals by sharing my experiences and connections is my ultimate goal.

LCWA Advisory Board Member Adam Chubb on Exercise Science in Germany and his decade as a professional basketball player in the German Bundesliga

BERLIN – MARCH 25: Adam Chubb of Berlin in action during the Basketball Bundesliga match between Alba Berlin and Ratiopharm Ulm at the O2 World Arena on March 25, 2009 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Matthias Kern/Bongarts/Getty Images)



Thinking about what foreign language to combine with your Exercise Science or Athletic Training major? Former professional basketball player Adam Chub advises students to consider German! A member of the advisory board of CofC’s school of Languages, Cultures and World Affairs, Adam spent a decade playing in the German Bundesliga, for teams such as Alba Berlin, Gießen 46ers, and Eisbären Bremerhaven. During his career in Europe, he learned first hand why Germany is a world leader in the fields of exercise science and sports medicine. Read more about his experience and his role in CofC’s School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs in this Q&A.

Q: What led you to play professional basketball in Germany and what was it like to play there for a decade?

A. I accepted a job in Germany my second year out playing professional basketball. I originally went to Germany because I was offered a job, but stayed for 10 years because I loved the country, its people and culture. They had a great sports culture and basketball was an up and coming sport due to Dirk Nowitzki catching on fast in the NBA. The culture and atmosphere was similar to the United States so that helped me feel comfortable no matter what region of the country I played and lived in some small farm towns as well as big cities like Berlin. I was able to get a feel for the country and its people over my 10 years there.

Q: During your long career in Germany, you worked with a wide range of professionals in sports medicine, physiotherapy, and athletic training. How and why does Germany excel so much in these fields?

A. The German Sport University in a renowned university in Köln that was founded in 1947. With 6000 students, the university produces some of the top sports medicine professionals in the world. Germany also has a strong soccer culture and high-performing clubs that demand top doctors, trainers and physiotherapists to keep their athletes healthy. Even American athletes like Kobe Bryant and Alex Rodriguez have traveled to Germany to see German doctors and get treatment they can’t receive anywhere else in the world.

Q. You didn’t speak German before you made the move, but learned German on the ground and on the court. Why should students interested in careers in sports-related fields learn German?

A. Since Germany is known for its sports medicine, learning German would be beneficial to anyone interested in a sports-related field. With the globalization of sports and business today, speaking German would created great opportunities in the United States as well as overseas. It would give you top-level access to sports and medicine-related fields as well as education.

Q. After you ended your career, you moved to Charleston and recently joined the Advisory Board of CofC’s School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs. Why did you get involved with LCWA at the College and what do you hope to accomplish on the board?

A. I am hoping to be a resource for advice and guidance to the school and students through my international, cultural and business experiences in Europe. Being able help others reach their international business and education goals by sharing my experiences and connections is my ultimate goal.