Black Suffering Is NOT a Costume – Mari N. Crabtree

“But it is not permissible that the authors of devastation should also be innocent. It is the innocence which constitutes the crime.” –James Baldwin, “My Dungeon Shook” from The Fire Next Time

Today I remember Freddie Gray. I remember his life cut short by the Baltimore Police Department. I remember his spine nearly severed as he was flung around the back of a police van. I remember the hours it took before he received medical treatment. I remember the week his family watched as life left his body. I remember the zero convictions of the officers who killed him. (We soil the memory of Freddie Gray to see mere indictments as a victory. Indictments that relieve killers of culpability are a paltry consolation prize for the dead and the survivors.) I remember the anger boiling over on the streets—the flames, the rocks, the broken windows. I remember the media obsessing over “thugs” and “violence” and “black rage,” and yet neglecting the root cause of this rage, police brutality against black bodies.

I remember Freddie Gray on this day because white students at the institution where I work mock his suffering. They flaunt his suffering—wear his suffering as a literal costume, display his suffering like a trophy, smile at and spread his suffering. I am writing a book about the legacies of lynching, but it doesn’t take a scholar of white supremacist violence to see that past rhyming with this present. I can’t help but think, as I prepare to teach James Baldwin’s short story, “Going to Meet the Man,” today, how freely and comfortably these students trivialize and celebrate black death. I am left wondering (But am I? Is there much to wonder at anymore? Don’t I know by now?) what they think of their African American classmates and professors, and the black Charleston community they are actively displacing through gentrification. And so, I turn back to my lesson plans with an unsatisfying sigh that fails to expel the disgust and anger I feel. There is a mountain of grim work ahead.

 

Dr. Viñas-de-Puig Presents Research at 2017 Hispanic Linguistics Symposium

On October 27, 2017, Professor Ricard Viñas-de-Puig presented his single-authored paper “Evidence for a typology of epistemic modality in Spanish and Catalan: Restructuring clitic climbing,” and the co-authored paper (in collaboration with Dr. Stephen Fafulas, University of Mississippi) “Leísmo in monolingual and bilingual varieties of Spanish in the Peruvian Amazon” at the 2017 Hispanic Linguistics Symposium, held at Texas Tech University.

Fall 2017 LCWA World Affairs Colloquium Series

The Fall 2017 LCWA World Affairs Colloquium Series will be held on November 30th. Dr. William J. Parker III will be presenting the lecture in the Wells Fargo Auditorium beginning at 4:00pm.

William J. Parker III, PhD
EastWest Institute
Chief Operating Officer

Dr. William J Parker III is the Chief Operating Officer at the EastWest Institute, a global NGO committed to conflict prevention and resolution with offices in New York, Brussels, Moscow, Istanbul, San Francisco, Washington, D.C. and Dallas.

An award-winning author, Dr. Parker has published over thirty academic articles and co-authored the book Jihadist Strategic Communication. Additionally, his 2016 book, Guaranteeing America’s Security in the Twenty-First Century, is considered a practitioners’ guide to national security.

Dr. Parker is an accomplished speaker and frequent guest commentator in global media on issues of national security and the global economy. He has addressed the media in more than thirty nations, including such outlets as Fox News, National Public Radio, Al Jazeera, Patriot Radio, Voice of America and other live radio and television shows. He appears in and consulted on the 2016 Discovery Channel documentary Sonic Sea, which was nominated for an Emmy Award for Best Nature Documentary.

CofC and The Citadel Announce Finalists for 13th Annual SC Spanish Teacher of the Year

The College of Charleston’s and The Citadel’s chapters of Sigma Delta Pi, the National Collegiate Hispanic Honor Society, are proud to announce the three finalists of their 13th annual South Carolina Spanish Teacher of the Year Award for 2017:

Bethany Battig-Ramseur of Hilton Head Preparatory School
Julia Rowsam of Northwestern High School
Tracy Stroud of Carolina Forest High School

All three finalists will be recognized and the awardee announced during a ceremony on Thursday, November 16, 2017 in Alumni Memorial Hall at the College of Charleston in Charleston, S.C.  Each finalist will receive an award plaque courtesy of the College of Charleston’s and The Citadel’s chapters of Sigma Delta Pi, and each finalist and their guests will enjoy complimentary lodging the evening of November 16, 2017 and breakfast on November 17 courtesy of the Francis Marion Hotel in downtown Charleston.

Sigma Delta Pi’s 2017 S.C. Spanish Teacher of the Year will also receive a $500 cash award courtesy of D. Virgil Alfaro, III, M.D., The Citadel class of 1984.

All questions regarding the contest should be forwarded to Dr. Mark P. Del Mastro, Founding Director of Sigma Delta Pi’s South Carolina Spanish Teacher of the Year Award, College of Charleston: delmastromp@cofc.edu.

 

African American Studies Alumni Profile: Brandon Chapman ‘16

For the last 10 months, I’ve been working as a community organizer in Charleston and North Charleston. I work for the Charleston Area Justice Ministry (CAJM), which is a local nonprofit made up of 28 congregations and organizations in the area. We’re an interfaith organization and consists of Catholic parishes, Baptist and Methodist churches, as well as the synagogue and a mosque. We work together and are united in our pursuit for justice.

My job as an organizer is to build relationships with members of the community so that we can make systemic changes. We go through an annual process with three focus areas. First, we conduct house meetings throughout the area to listen to community problems. Members of the community share personal stories about how a community problem is affecting them. Then we vote on the top problem that emerged out of our house meetings. Secondly, we research the problem by meeting with experts to make sure we are finding best practices. Thirdly, we conduct an investment drive to ensure that we are financially stable. Using this process, CAJM has made some lasting changes in the community. Our work has resulted in two hundred extra pre-K slots added per year throughout the Charleston County School District and schools that now use programs to teach students conflict resolution. We have also worked with the four local police departments to implement an objective scoring tool in interactions with juveniles, and we’re currently pushing Charleston and North Charleston to audit the police force for racial bias.

I became interested in community organizing when I did my Capstone project for African American Studies. I researched the similarities and differences between the Civil Rights Movement and the Black Lives Matter Movement. My research led me to focus on the role of the church in the Civil Rights Movement, particularly how the church served as the institution where leaders organized. I noticed that the church wasn’t functioning in the same way in today’s movements. As a part of my analysis, I researched Civil Rights leaders and their methods of organizing. Out of all of the leaders I researched, Ella Baker influenced me the most. Baker and her work with Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and her advice to the students who founded the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) stuck out to me. Baker argued, “strong people don’t need strong leaders.” What she meant was that everyone has a place in organizations, and successful movements don’t need one leader telling them what steps they should take. It was this paper and research that encouraged me to look more into church-based community organizing.

Brandon Chapman is a community organizer for the Charleston Area Justice Ministry. He graduated from the College of Charleston in 2016 with degrees in African American Studies and Political Science.

 

Allison Sterrett-Krause Publishes on Roman Glass

Source: The College Today. College of Charleston

Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause’s latest article in the Journal of Glass Studies is now out:

Sterrett-Krause, A. 2017. ‘Drinking with the Dead? Glass from Roman and Christian Burial Areas at Leptiminus (Lamta, Tunisia).’ Journal of Glass Studies 59: 47-82.

Check out the recent article on Dr. Sterrett-Krause’s work in The College Today.