CLAW conference “Transforming Public History” a great success

The Carolina Lowcounty and Atlantic World Program announced the success of the “Transforming Public History from Charleston to the Atlantic World” that took place on June 4th-17th.

Find their write up here http://claw.cofc.edu/2017/06/21/transforming-public-history-conference-a-great-success/

The event drew over 280 participants from Barbados, Brazil, Colombia, and the United Kingdom as well as all over the US. There were two public events, a series of workshops, plenary sessions, and panel presentations addressed the many and various issues of race and social justice that confront public historians as they attempt to interpret historic sites and to render historical narratives more properly inclusive.

Articles referencing the event were many! Here are just a few.

Post and Courier

Smart Women Write

Prof. Garrett Davidson in the College of Charleston Magazine

Arabic Studies professor Garrett Davidson was honored in the College of Charleston Magazine this summer. Professor Davidson strives to foster connections with a part of the world that students might otherwise now know.

“This is a region that’s very misunderstood,” says Davidson, adding that 21st-century American cinema hasn’t helped the matter. “Arabs tend to be villainized and dehumanized in Hollywood films. So, one of the goals is to humanize them for these students – to connect them to these societies in a way that challenges their perceptions.”

“This course explores political and social issues that are very foreign to students – and in a very foreign environment. So, using a medium that they are so familiar with – that they are comfortable with – makes it more approachable,” says Davidson, noting that the course includes films from all over the Arabic world, from Morocco to Iraq, providing the perfect channel for exploring any number of political, historical and cultural issues. “These films are exposing them to important themes in modern Arab societies and cultures in ways they really connect with.”

The full article can be found here: http://today.cofc.edu/2017/06/16/arabic-studies/

Statement Condemning White Supremacist Violence in Charlottesville – African American Studies Faculty

White supremacist mob in Charlottesville, VA (2017)

 

Lynch mob in Marion, IN (1930)

The white supremacist and white nationalist violence that erupted in Charlottesville last weekend made visible, with terrifying clarity, a truth at the heart of US history: white power, when confronted with threats, real or imagined, reacts with violence and death. As scholars who study the history and culture of African Americans, we recognize that black life is far richer and far more beautiful than a litany of abuses. We choose to frame black life beyond the reach of what Toni Morrison called “the white gaze,” but the fury of a white mob in 2017, wielding torches, brandishing pipes and assault rifles, spewing hate-filled rhetoric, and ramming a car into a peaceful anti-racist march threatens to impinge upon life beyond the white gaze. With images of that furious mob flooding our televisions and news feeds, we could not help but see in those faces a hatred tinged with arrogance reminiscent of the smiling white faces gazing out of lynching photographs from the Jim Crow era. This family resemblance reminds us that what happened in Charlottesville is as American as that small college town’s favorite son, Thomas Jefferson, which is to say, what happened in Charlottesville is as American as enslavement and lynching and convict leasing and debt peonage and mass incarceration.

The African American Studies Program condemns the white supremacist, neo-Confederate, and neo-Nazi ideologies harbored by the mob in Charlottesville as well as the violence these ideologies breed. We mourn the dead, and we wish healing to those anti-racist protesters who have suffered injuries of all stripes. We also recognize that what happened in Charlottesville was not exceptional or unique, after all, we remember all too well the massacre that happened just blocks from our offices two summers ago. Our students have already begun to return to campus in advance of the fall semester, and as much as recent events have shaken and disgusted us, we are deeply concerned for our students who are grappling with these acts of violence and their political aftershocks. In moments like these, the value of African American Studies as a discipline cannot be overstated. We, as educators, remain steadfast in our responsibility to provide the analytical tools, conceptual frameworks, and historical contexts to make our contemporary moment legible, if not comprehensible. We also remain committed to supporting our students, most especially those students of color for whom the violence in Charlottesville is no mere abstraction but a threat to their very existence. This violence may be a harbinger of even more terrifying things to come, but the tradition of radical protest that undergirds so much of African American history and culture keeps us pushing back and pressing forward.

CofC’s Nu Zeta Chapter of Sigma Delta Pi Named Honor Chapter for 7th Consecutive Year

The Nu Zeta Chapter of Sigma Delta Pi, the National Collegiate Hispanic Honor Society, was among 12 of the 613 chapters of Sigma Delta Pi nationwide to receive the Honor Chapter award for outstanding activities executed during the 2016-17 academic year.  This was the 7th consecutive year that the College of Charleston received this prestigious recognition, to coincide with the chapter’s 40th anniversary (1977-2017).  Drs. Susan Divine and Carmen Grace of Hispanic Studies are Nu Zeta’s chapter advisers, and along with past student chapter president Maya Novák-Cogdell, they were instrumental for this national recognition.

Dr. Edward Chauca Presents Research at International Conferences

Professor Edward Chauca presented his research in two different conferences in summer 2017:

  1. “Perú al pie del orbe: Re-appropriating Science and Technology in Novels by César Vallejo and Clemente Palma” at the American Comparative Literature Association’s 2017 Annual Meeting at Utrecht University, Netherlands. July, 6-9, 2017.
  2. “La distopía del sujeto moderno: racionalidad, materialidad y afecto en Travesía de extramares.” Latin American Studies Association Annual Congress inLima, Perú. April 29-May 1, 2017.

Dr. Vicki Garrett Presents Research at Two Summer Conferences

Professor Vicki Garrett presented her research at two different conferences during the summer of 2017:

  1. “The Body and the Popular: Performing Politics in Argentine Popular Theater” at the Latin American Studies Association Annual Congress in Lima, Peru, on April 29, 2017.
  2. “Trauma and Coming of Age in Alonzo Ruizpalcios’s Güeros” at the American Comparative Literature Association in Utrecht, Netherlands, on July 7, 2017.