Dr. Del Mastro Participates in XV CILEC in Madrid, Spain

Professor Mark Del Mastro participated in the 15th annual International Conference of Contemporary Spanish Literature (CILEC) at the Universidad Complutense of Madrid, Spain (June 23-25, 2014), where he presented his study “Carmen Laforet y el décimo aniversario de Al volver la esquina.”  He was also an invited panelist in the round table session entitled “La literatura española por el mundo.”

David Brion Davis’s Final Word on Slavery and Emancipation

David Brion Davis recently published The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Emancipation, the third volume in a trilogy of books on the history of slavery in Western culture. The first one came out nearly fifty years ago, so this last one is the culmination and distillation of a life’s work. What’s so cool about it is that it is dedicated to the ending of slavery, the history of emancipation from the Haitian Revolution through to the passage of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments in the US. The reference to the Haitian Revolution also indicates something important about Davis’s angle: that he’s not focusing on conscientious white abolitionists and what Marcus Wood calls “the horrible gift of freedom“, but on the role of black abolitionists. The book is well worth the read. For a fuller account, you can read my review in the Charleston Post and Courier.

Filed under: Jubilee Project

Field and Lab technician position open with Brockington and Associates in their Mt. Pleasant, SC office

http://www.brockington.org/Careers/summary.php?j=126

(applications due June 18, 2014)

Brockington and Associates is seeking an experienced archaeological field and lab technician based in our Mt Pleasant, SC office. The position requires an individual with a bachelor’s degree in archaeology, anthropology, or a related field, and a minimum of field school or the equivalent field experience.
This job will require the successful applicant to perform both field and laboratory duties as needed.
Work schedule will include 40 hour weeks. No overtime is expected on these assignments. We will provide vehicles for daily travel between the project area and the office. Single- occupancy hotel rooms and meal allowance are provided when traveling is required. Brockington offers benefits including, health and dental insurance, 401K and paid vacation

About the Job:

Field responsibilities include the ability to conduct shovel testing and/or other unit excavations, artifact identification, note-taking, recording soil and other observations, field photography, use of handheld Global Positioning Systems devices, and general tasks under the direction of the Project Manager. Travel, physical labor, and time spent in outdoor conditions are a requirement of this job.
Lab responsibilities include complete processing of archaeological specimens (washing, labeling, cataloging, etc.) The successful applicant conducts all aspects of the management of archaeological collections including inventorying and preparation for long-term curation: primary sorting and preliminary analysis of archaeological artifacts, maintaining and verifying specimen logs and other documentation on archaeological projects, data entry, updating and verification of the archaeological database. Other responsibilities include assisting with and becoming familiar with more detailed artifact analysis, monitoring and upkeep the ongoing electrolysis conservation projects, artifact photography using digital imaging system, preparing related archival materials for long-term curation, and performing other related duties as assigned.

Full/Part-time: Full-time

Driving required: Yes

Application due date: Applications must be received no later than 5:00 pm on June 18 or they will not be processed or considered.

 

Director Proud of Avery’s Role in Celebrating Black Life

Director Proud of Avery’s Role in Celebrating Black Life

30 May 2014 | 10:29 am By:

Patricia Williams Lessane has served as executive director of the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture at the College of Charleston since August 2010.

Patricia Williams Lessane

Before joining the College, Lessane was a faculty member at Roosevelt University and a consultant for The Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago. She holds a bachelor’s in English from Fisk University, a master’s in liberal studies from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D in Anthropology from University of Illinois at Chicago.

Q: As a cultural anthropologist, one of your research focuses is on Black life in popular culture. Can you talk about this topic in the context of what you have accomplished at Avery?

A: I think our public programs — specifically the conferences, film screenings, and public lectures — best reflect my interest in Black life in popular culture and the intersection of race, class, and gender in Black life. We’ve been able to bring some of the best minds to the College, including Drs. Harry and Michelle Elam (Stanford University), Dr. Joyce Ann Joyce (Temple University), Dr. Cathy Cohen (University of Chicago), filmmaker Julie Dash, and Dr. Johnetta Cole (Director of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African Art) to name a few.

Q: What are some of your current projects?

A: I teach every semester. It gives me the opportunity to connect with our students, and I enjoy talking to them and discussing the topics I am passionate about. I teach courses in African American Studies and Anthropology, including African American Society and Culture, Black Bodies in Television and Film, and The Peoples and Cultures of Africa. Next spring (2015), I will teach a First Year Seminar course on the Great Migration.

Patricia Williams Lessane with U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn.

I am co-editing with Dr. Conseula Francis, an anthology of essays on the work of filmmaker Julie Dash, and co-editing with Dr. Violet Johnson (University of Texas College Station) and Dr. Gundolf Graml (Agnes Scott College) a volume of essays, Deferred Dreams, Defiant Struggles: Critical Perspectives on Blackness, Belonging and Civil Rights (part of the FORECAAST Series by the Collegium of African American Research).

I am working on an essay about the 50th anniversary of Nothing But a Man, a film by Michael Roemer and Michael Young. And, I am so excited about our recent NEA award to develop a documentary about the remarkable life and work of Vertamae Smart-Grovesnor. So I will be making a film with Julie Dash!

I am equally thrilled that our 2014 symposium, “The Marrow of Tradition: The Black Film in the American Cinematic Tradition,” will screen and highlight the work of African American filmmakers and generate critical dialogue about the Black film tradition and the salient ways issues of race, class, gender, oppression, resistance, and liberation struggles have historically inculcated in the work of radical pioneers of race film and many that followed.

We take our name from Charles Chestnutt’s remarkable novel of the same title. A fearless commentator on racial violence and injustice, Chestnutt’s novel chronicles the events, which lead up to a fictional race riot in Wellington, North Carolina.

RELATED: Read a 2011 profile of Lessane in The Post and Courier.

Q: What object, story, or person associated with Avery has had a strong impact on you and why?

A: I have spent a good deal of time on the papers of Dr. Millicent E. Brown, so I’ve gotten to know a great deal about her life and work in civil rights and as a Black pedagogue. While I haven’t done any research on the Septima P. Clark collection, I am just so proud to be able to say that we have it. She is such an important figure in African American history, the Civil Rights Movement, and Black Charleston.

Most recently, I used the Joseph Towles Collection for my Anthropology 322 course — The Peoples and Cultures of Africa. It’s such a rich collection. As an anthropologist, having the work of anthropological luminary Colin Turnbull -a brilliant but unsung African American anthropologist — at my fingertips is truly an added bonus of working here. My dream is to develop a mixed media traveling exhibit about Towles.

Q: Anything else you’d like to share about Avery?

A: Three of our Avery staff members are headed to the Ivy Leagues this summer! I am headed to the Harvard Institute of Higher Education Management Development Program, and Mary Battle and Shelia Harrell-Roye will both be at Yale for the Yale Public History Institute.

 RELATED: Watch a 2011 video interview with Lessane.