Brown Bag (Nov 8): “Researching Slavery at the University of South Carolina and Presenting it to the Public: Building the ‘Slavery at South Carolina College’ Website,”

Mark your calendars! Avery Research Center, Nov 8, 12:30 –1:45pm

Brown Bag Series: “Researching Slavery at the University of South Carolina and Presenting it to the Public: Building the ‘Slavery at South Carolina College’ Website,” Robert Weyeneth and Evan Kutzler, University of South Carolina, hosted by Avery and CLAW, Avery Research Center. Over just a single semester in Spring 2011, nine history graduate students in the Public History Program’s “Historic Site Interpretation” class at the University of South Carolina researched and built a website entitled “Slavery at South Carolina College” (http://library.sc.edu/digital/slaveryscc/). Evan Kutzler, a PhD student from this course, and Dr. Robert Weyeneth discuss the challenges and opportunities they faced in telling the largely unknown story of how slaves and slavery were essential to the physical construction of South Carolina College (later renamed the University of South Carolina) and to the intellectual life of faculty and students at USC, from its founding in 1801 through the Civil War.

Directions to Avery: http://avery.cofc.edu/visit/mapsdirections/

Brown Bag (Nov 8): “Researching Slavery at the University of South Carolina and Presenting it to the Public: Building the ‘Slavery at South Carolina College’ Website,”

Mark your calendars! Avery Research Center, Nov 8, 12:30 –1:45pm

Brown Bag Series: “Researching Slavery at the University of South Carolina and Presenting it to the Public: Building the ‘Slavery at South Carolina College’ Website,” Robert Weyeneth and Evan Kutzler, University of South Carolina, hosted by Avery and CLAW, Avery Research Center. Over just a single semester in Spring 2011, nine history graduate students in the Public History Program’s “Historic Site Interpretation” class at the University of South Carolina researched and built a website entitled “Slavery at South Carolina College” (http://library.sc.edu/digital/slaveryscc/). Evan Kutzler, a PhD student from this course, and Dr. Robert Weyeneth discuss the challenges and opportunities they faced in telling the largely unknown story of how slaves and slavery were essential to the physical construction of South Carolina College (later renamed the University of South Carolina) and to the intellectual life of faculty and students at USC, from its founding in 1801 through the Civil War.

Directions to Avery: http://avery.cofc.edu/visit/mapsdirections/