Students Present Research Projects on Political Issues

Students Present Research Projects on Political Issues.

This event, hosted by the Political Science department on March 29, featured some of our own INTL majors:

Panel 1: American Politics and Processes I

Michelle Bloom
Congressional Campaign Finance (Political Science Major, College of Charleston)

Panel 2: Global Politics and Spaces

Sarah Beth Mentrup
China’s Strategy for Tapping into Tibet (Political Science Major, College of Charleston)

Panel 4: Politics of Ideas I

Elizabeth McWhinnie
Journey for Jackinda: A New Discourse for Environmental Children’s Literature (International Studies Major, College of Charleston)

 

Spanish Major Jocelyn Moratzka and Dr. Verlinden Honored at ExCEL Awards Ceremony

On Wednesday evening, March 27, 2013 at  The ExCEL Awards Ceremony, two members of Hispanic Studies enjoyed prestigious, college-wide recognitions: Spanish major Jocelyn Moratzka was named “”LCWA Outstanding Student of the Year,” and Professor Marianne Verlinden was named “LCWA Outstanding Faculty of the Year.”

“Which Institutions When: Economic Freedom and Comparative Development” – Josh Hall – 3/28/2013 – College of Charleston

Upcoming Event: TODAY! at 7pm

Location Information:
Main Campus – Beatty Center (View Map)
5 Liberty Street
Charleston, SC
Room: Room 115 (Auditorium)

“Which Institutions When: Economic Freedom and Comparative Development” – Josh Hall – 3/28/2013 – College of Charleston.

A Transatlantic Approach: Contestatory Fictions of Market-Oriented Practices from Argentina and Spain

Upcoming Event: Friday, March 29, 3:00pm in Hawkins LLC
Argentina-Spain_Markets
Dr. Lola Colomina-Garrigos, Hispanic Studies Department The transition from an industrial economy to an information and networked economy has profound implications for entire industries.  New business models will emerge on the back of disru…ptive technological advances and organizational structures and the nature of many jobs will change. The “big data” revolution is leading systems that, thanks to tracking every detail of your past, could predict your future habits and health—or help you avoid traffic accidents or paying too much for airfare. In this interactive session we will explore a few of these emerging  predictive mobile applications.

ASALH Call for Papers, 2013 Conference

From ASALH:

Association for the Study of African American Life and History

March 2013

Marking the sesquicentennial of the Emancipation Proclamation and the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History invites papers, panels, and round-tables on these and related topics of black emancipation, freedom, justice and equality, and the movements that have sought to achieve these goals. Submissions may focus on the historical periods tied to the 2013 theme, their precursors and successors, and other past and contemporary moments across the breadth of African American history.

The submission deadline is May 15, 2013!

Scroll down and read through the Call for Papers to learn more.
***

At the Crossroads of Freedom: The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington

The year 2013 marks two important anniversaries in the history of African Americans and the United States. On January 1, 1863, the Emancipation Proclamation set the United States on the path of ending slavery. A wartime measure issued by President Abraham Lincoln, the proclamation freed relatively few slaves, but it fueled the fire of the enslaved to strike for their freedom. In many respects, Lincoln’s declaration simply acknowledged the epidemic of black self-emancipation – spread by black freedom crusaders like Harriet Tubman – that already had commenced beyond his control. Those in bondage increasingly streamed into the camps of the Union Army, reclaiming and asserting self-determination. The result, abolitionist Fredrick Douglass predicted, was that the war for the Union became a war against slavery. The actions of both Lincoln and the slaves made clear that the Civil War was in deed, as well as in theory, a struggle between the forces of slavery and emancipation. The full-scale dismantlement of the “peculiar institution” of human bondage had begun.

In 1963, a century later, America once again stood at the crossroads. Nine years earlier, the U.S. Supreme Court had outlawed racial segregation in public schools, but the nation had not yet committed itself to equality of citizenship. Segregation and innumerable other forms of discrimination made second-class citizenship the extra-constitutional status of non-whites. Another American president caught in the gale of racial change, John F. Kennedy, temporized over the legal and moral issue of his time. Like Lincoln before him, national concerns, and the growing momentum of black mass mobilization efforts, overrode his personal ambivalence toward demands for black civil rights. On August 28, 1963, hundreds of thousands of Americans, blacks and whites, Jews and gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, marched to the memorial of Abraham Lincoln, the author of the Emancipation Proclamation, in the continuing pursuit of equality of citizenship and self-determination. It was on this occasion that Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his celebrated “I Have a Dream” speech. Just as the Emancipation Proclamation had recognized the coming end of slavery, the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom announced that the days of legal segregation in the United States were numbered.

For more information, or to submit a paper proposal, visit ASALH’s website.

Filed under: Jubilee Project, Upcoming Events

ASALH Call for Papers, 2013 Conference

From ASALH:

Association for the Study of African American Life and History

March 2013

Marking the sesquicentennial of the Emancipation Proclamation and the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History invites papers, panels, and round-tables on these and related topics of black emancipation, freedom, justice and equality, and the movements that have sought to achieve these goals. Submissions may focus on the historical periods tied to the 2013 theme, their precursors and successors, and other past and contemporary moments across the breadth of African American history.

The submission deadline is May 15, 2013!

Scroll down and read through the Call for Papers to learn more.
***

At the Crossroads of Freedom: The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington

The year 2013 marks two important anniversaries in the history of African Americans and the United States. On January 1, 1863, the Emancipation Proclamation set the United States on the path of ending slavery. A wartime measure issued by President Abraham Lincoln, the proclamation freed relatively few slaves, but it fueled the fire of the enslaved to strike for their freedom. In many respects, Lincoln’s declaration simply acknowledged the epidemic of black self-emancipation – spread by black freedom crusaders like Harriet Tubman – that already had commenced beyond his control. Those in bondage increasingly streamed into the camps of the Union Army, reclaiming and asserting self-determination. The result, abolitionist Fredrick Douglass predicted, was that the war for the Union became a war against slavery. The actions of both Lincoln and the slaves made clear that the Civil War was in deed, as well as in theory, a struggle between the forces of slavery and emancipation. The full-scale dismantlement of the “peculiar institution” of human bondage had begun.

In 1963, a century later, America once again stood at the crossroads. Nine years earlier, the U.S. Supreme Court had outlawed racial segregation in public schools, but the nation had not yet committed itself to equality of citizenship. Segregation and innumerable other forms of discrimination made second-class citizenship the extra-constitutional status of non-whites. Another American president caught in the gale of racial change, John F. Kennedy, temporized over the legal and moral issue of his time. Like Lincoln before him, national concerns, and the growing momentum of black mass mobilization efforts, overrode his personal ambivalence toward demands for black civil rights. On August 28, 1963, hundreds of thousands of Americans, blacks and whites, Jews and gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, marched to the memorial of Abraham Lincoln, the author of the Emancipation Proclamation, in the continuing pursuit of equality of citizenship and self-determination. It was on this occasion that Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his celebrated “I Have a Dream” speech. Just as the Emancipation Proclamation had recognized the coming end of slavery, the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom announced that the days of legal segregation in the United States were numbered.

For more information, or to submit a paper proposal, visit ASALH’s website.

Filed under: Jubilee Project, Upcoming Events