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Curriculum

 Typically, each student will chose two courses from the options listed here.  None of the meeting times will conflict.  Each course “counts” for humanities credit in your general education requirements, and also for the Irish and Irish American Studies minor.

ENGL 290/363:  Sex, God, and Guns:  Irish Culture in the 20th Century

Professor Joe Kelly.  The Irishman serves two masters, James Joyce once said, and a third who wants him for odd jobs:  the holy Roman Catholic church and British Empire were the two masters, and the odd jobber was the nationalist who dodged the priests to shoot the English.  This course will study the interplay of culture and political ideology in Ireland in the last hundred years, focusing on a few key moments in history, including the Easter Rising of 1916, the partition of Northern Ireland, the modern “troubles,” and the Good Friday Agreement.

[English majors:  post-1900 literature in history; English minors:  300-level elective; Irish and Irish American studies:  one elective; general education:  humanities requirement]

ENGL 390:  Studies in Irish Cinema

Professor Colleen Glenn. Rich with issues of civil rights, injustice, identity, gender, creativity/artistry, and the politics of place, Irish cinema offers an important lens through which to view Irish culture and history. This course will explore some of the most important Irish films, both iconic and contemporary, to see not only what they “say” about Ireland, but also how they say it. We will also be considering how Ireland has loomed large in America’s imagination, and we will investigate the ways nostalgia, memory, and fantasy have influenced how Americans have understood (and misunderstood) Ireland—and Hollywood’s role in that process. Finally, as a tie-in with our field trip to Northern Ireland, we will be discussing a portion of the very popular Game of Thrones series, an HBO program that has helped to put Northern Ireland on the map for global film and television productions.

[English majors: “Film and Cultural Studies” requirement; English minors:  one of three 300-level courses; Film Studies minors:  “Specialized Topics in Film and Other Media; Irish and Irish American studies:  one elective; general education:  humanities requirement]

HIST 347/WGST 120: Gender and Sexuality in Irish Culture and History

Professor Cara Delay.  This course explores gender and sexuality in Irish culture and history. It focuses on the modern period (c. 1800-present), analyzing the experiences of women and men as gendered beings, the intersections between religion, sexuality, and culture, and family life.

By the end of the semester, students will have a greater understanding of women’s lives and gender roles in Ireland, past and present, and will have learned why gender is an essential category of historical analysis.

[History majors:  . . . ; Women’s and Gender Studies majors:  ;  Irish and Irish American studies minors:  one elective; general education:  humanities requirement]

IIAS 304:  Stadiums, Sports, Space and Fandom: The GAA, Rugby and Soccer in Ireland

Dr. Mathew Garrison.  In this course, students are introduced to the complex interrelationships between sports, fandom, space and the identity in Ireland specifically the GAA (Hurling and Gaelic Football), Rugby and Soccer. This course will not only examine the specific grounds associated with Sports in Ireland (i.e. Croke Park, Thomund Park and Aviva Stadium) but also the monuments, landscapes and geographic locations around the country associated sports and culture in Ireland. Through the exploration of the relationship of sports and space, students will better understand how sports acts as a cultural adjunct for native Irish and immigrant groups alike. Furthermore, students will better understand the contemporary difference of identity and sports in regard to geography, socio-economic level and racial/ethnic identity. Students will have the opportunity to attend sporting matches and visit different national spaces important to each sport (i.e. stadiums, monuments, neighborhoods and historical sites). Through the study of space and sports, students are exposed to the larger culture of Ireland including history, food, architecture, landscapes and music.

[Irish and Irish American studies minors:  one elective; general education:  humanities requirement]

THTR 288:  Good Fecking Plays from the Voices of New Irish Drama

Prof. Mark Landis.  Students will read and discuss plays by contemporary Irish dramatists such as Marina Carr, Conor McPherson, and others. Students would be presented with an historical overview of the development of Irish drama.  Of particular interest will be the impact contemporary Irish theatre companies (Corcadorca, Anu, and others) on the development of new literary voices in Irish drama.

[Theater majors: . . . ;  Irish and Irish American studies:  one elective; general education:  humanities requirement]

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