CofC Logo

Archives For Students

Charleston Lowcountry Field School Underway

By James Newhard
Posted on 16 June 2017 | 4:11 am — 

After a few weeks at Hampton Plantation, the team turns to possibly exploring the Revolutionary War siege of Charleston.

Students Receive Training in Roman Glass Studies

By James Newhard
Posted on 7 September 2016 | 1:20 pm — 

IMG00511-20140124-1613Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause has been working with students in processing the glass artifacts from Roman Carthage for the past several years, and is continuing this work this year. She will host an introductory session this Friday from 2:30-4:30 in BELL 217.

Meeting on Friday afternoons during the semester, volunteers are trained to catalogue and draw Roman glass fragments and asked to devote at least 12-15 hours over the course of the semester to our project. The team’s research goal is the eventual publication of late Roman and early Byzantine glass fragments from the Circus in Carthage.

This is an exciting opportunity to learn the basics of artifact analysis from a recognized expert in the field, in one of (if not the only) spaces in the country that holds ‘live’ unpublished glass artifacts from an archaeological project in the Mediterranean. In most cases, the artifacts stay in the country of origin, requiring extensive costs in travel for limited amounts of exposure to the material. In the case of the Roman glass assemblages from Carthage, the material has been legally exported, and are a 10-minute walk down the street. The unparalleled nature of this opportunity is palpable – both in terms of the thoroughness of the analysis and the opportunities for student training and high impact learning.

For more information, contact Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause directly (sterrettkrauseae@cofc.edu). Owing to demand, working on the glass assemblages is currently limited to enrolled College of Charleston students, although visitors are welcome.

Let’s make some pottery!

By James Newhard
Posted on 30 August 2016 | 1:05 pm — 

Pottery WorkshopThe Archaeology Club will host its first meeting of the year on WEDNESDAY AUGUST 31 at 5:30pm in BELL 217.

We will be talking about traditional pottery methods, including hands-on construction. Come an make your own pot!

Pottery firing (and weiner roast) to follow on Sept 10.

Congratulations to our graduates!

By James Newhard
Posted on 7 May 2016 | 6:23 pm — 
Congratulations to the Archaeology Class of 2015-16!
Majors:

Jami Baxley
Ella Butler
Micahael Chapman
Victoria Douglas
Carolyn Howle
Rebecca Hudson
Danielle Moase
Sarenna Nath
Matthew Ramsey
Heather Thomas
Jessica Yarborough

Minors:

Craig Garrison
Elena Mpougas
Henry Stocker

Best of luck in all of your future endeavors!

Student Awarded Fellowship to Turkey

By James Newhard
Posted on 14 March 2016 | 3:31 pm — 

blue_mosqueCongratulations to Brenna Knippen, who has been awarded a fellowship to the intensive advanced Turkish program of the American Research Institute in Turkey.  This is a nationally competitive program funded by the United States Department of Education, and is limited to 10 students who have demonstrated a knowledge of Turkish at the advanced intermediate level.

 

The fellowship provides round-trip airfare to Istanbul, application/tuition fees, and a stipend.

Excavations at Dixie Plantation in May 2016

By James Newhard
Posted on 8 February 2016 | 9:21 pm — 

For those interested in getting some archaeological experience and being a member of the research team at Dixie Plantation, Dr. Maureen Hays will be offering ANTH493 Field School in Archaeology (4 credits) in Maymester this year (May 16th to May 31st).

This course fulfills the Anthropology major Research Methods requirement and the Capstone requirement for the Archaeology major/minor.

ANTH202 is the prerequisite (or permission of Instructor).  If you have taken ANTH202 students will be able to sign up for the course when summer registration opens.  If students have not taken ANTH202 but really want to learn something about archaeology, send Dr. Hays an email requesting permission.

The property is owned by the College of Charleston Foundation and located in Hollywood, SC (about 40 minutes from downtown Charleston). Dixie Plantation has a long occupational history (both historic and prehistoric). Focus this summer will be on the early colonial occupation of the site (1700-1750).

The project is co-directed by Dr. Maureen Hays (College of Charleston) and Dr. Kim Pyszka (Auburn University at Montgomery).

For more detail, please see attached.

The ArchaeArchClubRoundtable2015ology Club, as a part of Native American History Month, is sponsoring a roundtable discussion on Friday, November 13 from 4:00 to 6:30 in the Alumni Center of the School of Education, Health, and Human Performance.

“Indigenous Communities and Archaeology: Points of Engagement, Points of Contention”

Panelists:
Christopher Judge: University of South Carolina – Lancaster
Christophe Boucher: College of Charleston
Wenonah Haire: Catawba Nation

Cosponsored by the Archaeology Program; the School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs; The School of Humanities and Social Sciences; and the Office of Multicultural Programs and Services.

Legendre and ASK present glassHow do archaeologists identify the fragmentary shards of glass found in excavations as bottles, plates, and cups?  Archaeologists at the College of Charleston can tell you. Sarah Legendre and Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause presented preliminary findings of their work conducted over the summer in the annual celebration of summer research at the College of Charleston.  Their study applied stepped regression analysis to develop a typological hierarchy, useful for identifying the functional type of most glass fragments found in Mediterranean contexts.  The quantitative approach aids a field in which previous studies had used more empirical categories, not always informed by statistical methods.

Their work, funded by the Office of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities, the Department of Classics, and the Yawkey Foundation and conducted at the Center for Social Science Research (CofC), will be formally presented at the upcoming 20th Congrès de l’Association Internationale pour l’Histoire du Verre in Fribourg, Switzerland.

mrd logoThe Marine Research Division of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology (SCIAA-MRD) is offering 3 internships for the fall 2105 semester:

1. Archaeological Collections, involved with doucmenting the archaeological teaching collection

2. Database and Digital Documentation, assisting in the development of a database and digitization of documents from over 40 years of dive records.

3. Social Media/Public History, assisting in the development of the MRD’s social media platform.

Please send cover letter, CV, and a list of 3 references to Jessica Irin at irwinJA@sc.edu.  Course credit can be arranged via the Department of Sociology and Anthropology.  Contact Dr. Qirko at qirkoh@cofc.edu.  See the attached flyer: MRD_2015_Internships_annoucment.

http://www.charlestonmuseum.org/news-events/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/IMG_4651.jpg

Students working during the 2015 Lowcountry Field School. Photo: Charleston Museum

This summer’s field school collected data from several contexts within the Lowcountry.  Investigations included soundings at Rose and Hampton Plantations, and historic properties in the urban core of Charleston.  See the report from Martha Zierden at the Charleston Museum blog post for more details.

Skip to toolbar