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Students Receive Training in Roman Glass Studies

By James Newhard
Posted on 7 September 2016 | 1:20 pm — 

IMG00511-20140124-1613Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause has been working with students in processing the glass artifacts from Roman Carthage for the past several years, and is continuing this work this year. She will host an introductory session this Friday from 2:30-4:30 in BELL 217.

Meeting on Friday afternoons during the semester, volunteers are trained to catalogue and draw Roman glass fragments and asked to devote at least 12-15 hours over the course of the semester to our project. The team’s research goal is the eventual publication of late Roman and early Byzantine glass fragments from the Circus in Carthage.

This is an exciting opportunity to learn the basics of artifact analysis from a recognized expert in the field, in one of (if not the only) spaces in the country that holds ‘live’ unpublished glass artifacts from an archaeological project in the Mediterranean. In most cases, the artifacts stay in the country of origin, requiring extensive costs in travel for limited amounts of exposure to the material. In the case of the Roman glass assemblages from Carthage, the material has been legally exported, and are a 10-minute walk down the street. The unparalleled nature of this opportunity is palpable – both in terms of the thoroughness of the analysis and the opportunities for student training and high impact learning.

For more information, contact Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause directly (sterrettkrauseae@cofc.edu). Owing to demand, working on the glass assemblages is currently limited to enrolled College of Charleston students, although visitors are welcome.

Student Awarded Fellowship to Turkey

By James Newhard
Posted on 14 March 2016 | 3:31 pm — 

blue_mosqueCongratulations to Brenna Knippen, who has been awarded a fellowship to the intensive advanced Turkish program of the American Research Institute in Turkey.  This is a nationally competitive program funded by the United States Department of Education, and is limited to 10 students who have demonstrated a knowledge of Turkish at the advanced intermediate level.

 

The fellowship provides round-trip airfare to Istanbul, application/tuition fees, and a stipend.

Excavations at Dixie Plantation in May 2016

By James Newhard
Posted on 8 February 2016 | 9:21 pm — 

For those interested in getting some archaeological experience and being a member of the research team at Dixie Plantation, Dr. Maureen Hays will be offering ANTH493 Field School in Archaeology (4 credits) in Maymester this year (May 16th to May 31st).

This course fulfills the Anthropology major Research Methods requirement and the Capstone requirement for the Archaeology major/minor.

ANTH202 is the prerequisite (or permission of Instructor).  If you have taken ANTH202 students will be able to sign up for the course when summer registration opens.  If students have not taken ANTH202 but really want to learn something about archaeology, send Dr. Hays an email requesting permission.

The property is owned by the College of Charleston Foundation and located in Hollywood, SC (about 40 minutes from downtown Charleston). Dixie Plantation has a long occupational history (both historic and prehistoric). Focus this summer will be on the early colonial occupation of the site (1700-1750).

The project is co-directed by Dr. Maureen Hays (College of Charleston) and Dr. Kim Pyszka (Auburn University at Montgomery).

For more detail, please see attached.

mrd logoThe Marine Research Division of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology (SCIAA-MRD) is offering 3 internships for the fall 2105 semester:

1. Archaeological Collections, involved with doucmenting the archaeological teaching collection

2. Database and Digital Documentation, assisting in the development of a database and digitization of documents from over 40 years of dive records.

3. Social Media/Public History, assisting in the development of the MRD’s social media platform.

Please send cover letter, CV, and a list of 3 references to Jessica Irin at irwinJA@sc.edu.  Course credit can be arranged via the Department of Sociology and Anthropology.  Contact Dr. Qirko at qirkoh@cofc.edu.  See the attached flyer: MRD_2015_Internships_annoucment.

“Uncovering Early Islam: The Role of Archaeology”

By Lauren Saulino
Posted on 17 April 2015 | 5:13 pm — 

Islam in Archaeology

5th Annual SC State Parks Archaeology Conference

By Lauren Saulino
Posted on 19 February 2015 | 4:34 pm — 

Call for Papers -2015 (2)

Lowcountry Archaeological Field School this Summer!

By Lauren Saulino
Posted on 2 February 2015 | 7:15 pm — 

COURSE: ANTH 493 Archaeological Field School, 8 s.h. of credit
DATES: Monday, May 18, 2015 through Thursday, June 2, 2015 (7 weeks)
TIME: 7:30 a.m. – 2:30/3:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
PLACES: Dill Property (James Island), Manigault House (downtown), and one of the state parks (yet to be determined)
INSTRUCTORS: Dr. Barbara Borg (CofC), Ms. Martha Zierden (Charleston Museum) and Mr. Ron Anthony (Charleston Museum).  Other archaeologists from the SC state parks system will also be working with us when we are working on one of their sites.
TRANSPORTATION: Students usually drive their own cars or arrange to ride with other students.  If the state park we work in is farther away than CharlesTowne Landing (West Ashley) or Colonial Dorchester (Summerville) the park service will hopefully provide a van and driver.  (This happened one year when we traveled to Hampton Plantation State Historic Site near McClellanville, SC).  Students are expected to be on site ready to work by 7:30 a.m. (this is to avoid the heat later in the day, and you will be grateful for it).

This is an intensive, team taught field school (a 400-level course), the goal of which is to teach you all the basic skills of doing field archaeology. All special equipment will be provided, though there will be one required reference text to purchase.  There is a hefty academic component to the course with articles to read and summarize (made availabale on the OAKS system), a mid-term ceramics identification exam, a synthetic hypothetical project exercise, and a final written exam.  You must be able to do the homework on your own time, after the field day is over, so this means evenings and weekends.  It is important to not over-schedule your life during field school.  60% of your final grade is field skills, and 40% is written work.

We dress sensibly for the temperature and the conditions, and no special clothing or shoes are required.  Athletic shoes, shorts, T-shirts, and hats are usual, long pants if we are working in the woods, and a rain poncho or jacket.  No sandals or flip flops are allowed for safety reasons.  Students bring their own sack lunches daily.  Water in coolers will be provided.  No alcohol is allowed.  Many students find the small rigid plastic coolers that hold food and drink (and that you can also sit on) to be very convenient, as we do not always have picnic tables.  Rest rooms are “usually” within walking distance.

A field school looks wonderful on your resume, and if you hope to work in, or go to graduate school in, archaeology you will be expected to have attended at least one substantial field school.  Field school teaches you how to work in a real research environment, and as a close-knit team despite occasional challenging weather extremes.  Field school is a wonderful experience for most, but you have to be serious about your participation.  You are graded on the skills you learn in field school, and there is little time to make up missed field days or written work.  Committing to doing all the work and staying on schedule is essential for success.  Those students who do this will find the field school to be a wonderful experience, we hope, and we have found this to be so over the past 20 years!

I hope this description finds some of you thinking seriously about field school.  This particular field school will not be held again until Summer 2017, though there are other possibilities both on and off campus to complete a field school. Again, shoot me an e-mail if you think you might be seriously interested: Dr. Borg (borgb@cofc.edu)

Lowcountry Archaeology Workshop, Friday Feb. 6

By Lauren Saulino
Posted on 2 February 2015 | 4:03 pm — 

In October 2014, an initial meeting of professional archaeologists interested in coordinating archaeological research in the Lowcountry was held. It was determined that such meetings would occur on a quarterly basis.  The first such meeting for this year will be held at the Lowcountry Graduate Center (in North Charleston), room 234 this Friday, February 6th from 3:30-5pm.

For questions, comments please contact Jim Newhard, Director of Archaeology at the College of Charleston. (newhardj@cofc.edu)

 

The Archaeology Club will be meeting this Thursday evening in Randolph Hall, Room 301B, at 5:30 pm.  In attendance will be a number of archaeologists from the area, discussing internship opportunities for the coming semester.

My old trowel.

November 2014- Isenbarger Flyer - Nov - Copy

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