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Renowned Scholar to Speak on Social Complexity

By James Newhard
Posted on 28 February 2017 | 2:36 pm — 

The Archaeology Program is pleased to announce a public lecture by Dr. Michael Galaty, professor and head of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures at Mississippi Sate University.

“From Plain to Plateau: The Origin of Social Complexity in Northern Albania”. Friday, March 24, 4:00 in Simons 309.

Research in northern Albania is shedding light upon the origins of social complexity, in particular upon the role of inter-regional interaction. Research conducted in the Albanian Alps, the Shkodra plain, and planned investigations on the Dukagjin Plateau in Kosovo highlight the role of interactions between groups inhabiting different ecological zones within the processes of complex social development and the negotiation of identity over the course of human history. Data generated by these various projects inform models of social complexity elsewhere in Europe, and elsewhere in the world.

Dr. Galaty is a former academic trustee of the Archaeological Institute of America, the author of dozens of seminal books and articles on emergent social systems, and recipient of significant grants and awards for his teaching and research.

Sponsored by the Archaeology Club, the Program in Archaeology, the Department of Classics, and the South Carolina Society of the Archaeological Institute of America.

Faculty Report on Summer Research

By James Newhard
Posted on 28 August 2016 | 4:36 pm — 

Field Reports F16For archaeologists at CofC, the summer is time for exploration via fieldwork and in-depth study. In partnership with the South Carolina Society of the Archaeological Institute of America, we present a series of short reports from the field by Drs. Harris, Hays, Ibarra, Newhard, and Sterrett-Krause. Come to hear what new and exciting work is happening!

Thursday, September 8 at 7:00pm
Simons Center for the Arts, 309
College of Charleston

Student Awarded Fellowship to Turkey

By James Newhard
Posted on 14 March 2016 | 3:31 pm — 

blue_mosqueCongratulations to Brenna Knippen, who has been awarded a fellowship to the intensive advanced Turkish program of the American Research Institute in Turkey.  This is a nationally competitive program funded by the United States Department of Education, and is limited to 10 students who have demonstrated a knowledge of Turkish at the advanced intermediate level.

 

The fellowship provides round-trip airfare to Istanbul, application/tuition fees, and a stipend.

“Uncovering Early Islam: The Role of Archaeology”

By Lauren Saulino
Posted on 17 April 2015 | 5:13 pm — 

Islam in Archaeology

2015AntiochiaFieldschoolBrochure

2015 Field School
Field school participants will be introduced to the basics of field archaeology. They will learn proper excavation techniques, archaeological survey, principles of field conservation, record keeping, site management, and archaeological surveying. Opportunities for field trips to nearby archaeological sites, such as Selinus, Lamos, Perge, Anamur, Alanya and the Alanya Museum will be arranged.

Duration
Session I : June 15-July 14
Session II: July 15-August 14
Deadline: February 1, 2015 (Note: Preference given to those who submit their applications before November 20, 2015)

Costs
$3150 for one session, $5800 for both sessions. Price excludes tuition and fees if taken for academic credit.

Academic Credit
Academic credit is optional. Participants can earn 3 or 6 credit hours through the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.
Undergraduate- $782.75, resident or non-resident, price includes tuition and fees only.

Logan Crouse tells of his work & exploration in Mongolia

By Lauren Saulino
Posted on 22 October 2014 | 4:45 pm — 

Today during the Anthropology & Sociology Brown Bag lunch, Archaeology & Anthropology Double Major, Logan Crouse shared about his travels and work in Mongolia.  He traveled there over the summer through a program organized by Western Kentucky University and the National Museum of Mongolia to study the Bronze and Iron Age societies which occupied the Altai region of western Mongolia.

Logan shared how he became one of the group’s primary surveyors and how he also was asked to hike along the ridge line of a mountain in search of rock art, among many other adventures.  In addition to his archaeological work, Logan experienced the culture of that region as well: his group was invited to a Kazak wedding where he was invited to participate in a Mongolian-derived tradition of wrestling.

 

 

 

Aerial image of Binchester Roman FortCollege of Charleston sophomore Sarah Legendre is participating in a Fulbright Summer Institute, one of the most prestigious and selective summer scholarship programs operating worldwide. Legendre, an Honors College student and double major in geology and archaeology, will spend four weeks at Durham University in the UK.  (read more)

 

 

Study Abroad in Greece – earn Geology elective credit

By Lauren Saulino
Posted on 19 February 2014 | 10:00 am — 

greece geol 2014

College of Charleston sophomore Jami Baxley is the only student participating in an archaeological project in Greece during the 2013 summer months. She will join two College of Charleston professors and other researchers for a month in Greece collecting archaeological data on more than 1,400 objects from the ancient Palace of Nestor in Pylos. Over the next year, the team, led by Classics Professor Kevin Pluta and Dimitri Nakassis of the University of Toronto, will compile a traditional print volume and a searchable online database of their findings. Jim Newhard, College of Charleston Professor and Director of the Archaeology Program, will also be a researcher on the project.

“I am absolutely thrilled to accompany two of my professors on this project in which I will gain hands on experience that will directly relate to my career aspirations,” says Baxley, a classics and archaeology major from Beech Island, S.C. “Being the only student is a bit nerve-racking (and exciting!), but I am ready for the challenge and look forward to all I will learn.”

The project will document via Reflexive Transference Imagery (RTI), 3D imagery, X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), and traditional illustration the administrative archives of the Palace of Nestor at Pylos, Greece. The publication and corresponding spatial database would effectively compile the scholarship of several generations of Linear B scholars into a concise, organized system, useable by scholars, students, and interested lay communities; and expand use of this dataset to broader cross-cultural comparative applications.

The online database, in development at the College of Charleston, will be searchable by tablet, fragment, word, or geochemical signature. The documentation via multiple imaging formats will also provide an archiving component to a valuable dataset that is of a fragile nature. The final images and data will reside at the College of Charleston on a dedicated server.

“This project is an excellent example of the ways in which the expertise and research of the faculty are leveraged for high impact experiences for students, while at the same time moving the discipline of archaeology forward in exciting ways,” explains Jim Newhard, Classics professor and incoming director of the archaeology program. “I am looking forward to seeing this collaboration develop for the benefit of all the cooperating institutions, researchers, and students.”

The project currently has funding from the Loeb Classical Library Foundation, the Institute for Aegean Prehistory, the Michael Ventris Foundation, and the College of Charleston.

For more information, contact Jim Newhard at newhardj@cofc.edu.

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