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New Leadership for Archaeology

By James Newhard
Posted on 30 June 2017 | 4:00 pm — 

The Archaeology Program is pleased to announce the appointment of its new Director. As of July 1, Dr. Scott Harris will be Director of Archaeology.

Dr. Harris received a PhD in geology from the University of Delaware and is a specialist in paleo-landscape evolution, primarily within coastal plain and contintental shelf environments. His most recent research has taken him to spaces off of the coast of the US southeast and Greece (the latter for which he was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship).

He follows James Newhard, who has served as Director of Archaeology since the inception of the major in 2013. Dr. Newhard steps down in order to more fully devote time to his responsibilities as interim Chair of the Department of Classics and as the Director of the newly-created Center for Historical Landscapes.

We wish Dr. Harris the best of good fortune, and thank Dr. Newhard for his years of service.

Charleston Lowcountry Field School Underway

By James Newhard
Posted on 16 June 2017 | 4:11 am — 

After a few weeks at Hampton Plantation, the team turns to possibly exploring the Revolutionary War siege of Charleston.

Renowned Scholar to Speak on Social Complexity

By James Newhard
Posted on 28 February 2017 | 2:36 pm — 

The Archaeology Program is pleased to announce a public lecture by Dr. Michael Galaty, professor and head of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures at Mississippi Sate University.

“From Plain to Plateau: The Origin of Social Complexity in Northern Albania”. Friday, March 24, 4:00 in Simons 309.

Research in northern Albania is shedding light upon the origins of social complexity, in particular upon the role of inter-regional interaction. Research conducted in the Albanian Alps, the Shkodra plain, and planned investigations on the Dukagjin Plateau in Kosovo highlight the role of interactions between groups inhabiting different ecological zones within the processes of complex social development and the negotiation of identity over the course of human history. Data generated by these various projects inform models of social complexity elsewhere in Europe, and elsewhere in the world.

Dr. Galaty is a former academic trustee of the Archaeological Institute of America, the author of dozens of seminal books and articles on emergent social systems, and recipient of significant grants and awards for his teaching and research.

Sponsored by the Archaeology Club, the Program in Archaeology, the Department of Classics, and the South Carolina Society of the Archaeological Institute of America.

Cultural Heritage in Conflict

By James Newhard
Posted on 28 November 2016 | 3:13 pm — 

natamroundtable2016The Archaeology Club and Archaeology Program are pleased to announce an upcoming roundtable discussion:

Friday, December 2, 4:30 – 6:00, EHHP Alumni Center.
“Cultural Heritage in the Age of Dirty Oil: Indigenous and Archaeological Concerns”. Free and open to the public.

 

Recent events in the Dakotas highlight the delicate balance between the desires for development and the needs for cultural and environmental protection. Often viewed as diametrically opposed forces, this need not always be the case. The evening’s discussion will focus upon recent conflicts in environmental and cultural heritage management as a way to see if and how greater dialogue and procedural reform can create a system built upon a shared notion of sustainable development.

 

Panelists will feature:

Dr. Eric Poplin, an archaeologist in Cultural Resource Management from Brockington and Associates,

Ms. Lisa Collins, the tribal administrator from the Wassamasaw Tribe of Varnertown Indians

Students Receive Training in Roman Glass Studies

By James Newhard
Posted on 7 September 2016 | 1:20 pm — 

IMG00511-20140124-1613Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause has been working with students in processing the glass artifacts from Roman Carthage for the past several years, and is continuing this work this year. She will host an introductory session this Friday from 2:30-4:30 in BELL 217.

Meeting on Friday afternoons during the semester, volunteers are trained to catalogue and draw Roman glass fragments and asked to devote at least 12-15 hours over the course of the semester to our project. The team’s research goal is the eventual publication of late Roman and early Byzantine glass fragments from the Circus in Carthage.

This is an exciting opportunity to learn the basics of artifact analysis from a recognized expert in the field, in one of (if not the only) spaces in the country that holds ‘live’ unpublished glass artifacts from an archaeological project in the Mediterranean. In most cases, the artifacts stay in the country of origin, requiring extensive costs in travel for limited amounts of exposure to the material. In the case of the Roman glass assemblages from Carthage, the material has been legally exported, and are a 10-minute walk down the street. The unparalleled nature of this opportunity is palpable – both in terms of the thoroughness of the analysis and the opportunities for student training and high impact learning.

For more information, contact Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause directly (sterrettkrauseae@cofc.edu). Owing to demand, working on the glass assemblages is currently limited to enrolled College of Charleston students, although visitors are welcome.

Let’s make some pottery!

By James Newhard
Posted on 30 August 2016 | 1:05 pm — 

Pottery WorkshopThe Archaeology Club will host its first meeting of the year on WEDNESDAY AUGUST 31 at 5:30pm in BELL 217.

We will be talking about traditional pottery methods, including hands-on construction. Come an make your own pot!

Pottery firing (and weiner roast) to follow on Sept 10.

Faculty Report on Summer Research

By James Newhard
Posted on 28 August 2016 | 4:36 pm — 

Field Reports F16For archaeologists at CofC, the summer is time for exploration via fieldwork and in-depth study. In partnership with the South Carolina Society of the Archaeological Institute of America, we present a series of short reports from the field by Drs. Harris, Hays, Ibarra, Newhard, and Sterrett-Krause. Come to hear what new and exciting work is happening!

Thursday, September 8 at 7:00pm
Simons Center for the Arts, 309
College of Charleston

On August 25, the Charleston Museum will host a book launch and signing for Martha Zierden (Curator at the Charleston Museum) and Elizabeth Reitz (professor of anthropology, University of Georgia) whose book, Charleston: an Archaeology of Life in a Coastal Community, has been recently published.

In addition to being curator at the Charleston Museum, Zierden holds a courtesy appointment in anthropology at the College of Charleston, and is a long-time collaborator/co-director of the College’s Lowcountry field school.

Book Launch and Signing for ‘Charleston: An Archaeology of Life in a Coastal Community’

Congratulations to our graduates!

By James Newhard
Posted on 7 May 2016 | 6:23 pm — 
Congratulations to the Archaeology Class of 2015-16!
Majors:

Jami Baxley
Ella Butler
Micahael Chapman
Victoria Douglas
Carolyn Howle
Rebecca Hudson
Danielle Moase
Sarenna Nath
Matthew Ramsey
Heather Thomas
Jessica Yarborough

Minors:

Craig Garrison
Elena Mpougas
Henry Stocker

Best of luck in all of your future endeavors!

Excavations at Dixie Plantation in May 2016

By James Newhard
Posted on 8 February 2016 | 9:21 pm — 

For those interested in getting some archaeological experience and being a member of the research team at Dixie Plantation, Dr. Maureen Hays will be offering ANTH493 Field School in Archaeology (4 credits) in Maymester this year (May 16th to May 31st).

This course fulfills the Anthropology major Research Methods requirement and the Capstone requirement for the Archaeology major/minor.

ANTH202 is the prerequisite (or permission of Instructor).  If you have taken ANTH202 students will be able to sign up for the course when summer registration opens.  If students have not taken ANTH202 but really want to learn something about archaeology, send Dr. Hays an email requesting permission.

The property is owned by the College of Charleston Foundation and located in Hollywood, SC (about 40 minutes from downtown Charleston). Dixie Plantation has a long occupational history (both historic and prehistoric). Focus this summer will be on the early colonial occupation of the site (1700-1750).

The project is co-directed by Dr. Maureen Hays (College of Charleston) and Dr. Kim Pyszka (Auburn University at Montgomery).

For more detail, please see attached.

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